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Wishes for hospitalized person
August 16, 2019 Anniversary Wishes 5 comments

Being sick is an unfortunate thing that can happen to someone especially to If you have stuck on how to write a letter to your friend in hospital wishing him a.


Are any of you sick? You should call for the elders of the church to come and pray over you, anointing you with oil in the name of the Lord.

James 5:14, (NLT)


Short prayer for a sick mother


Dear Abba Father,
I pray for mum, that she might be able to nestle into Your arms. You are her heavenly Dad, come and hold, protect and heal her of this sickness.

I ask this in Jesus name.
Amen.


(a prayer for a mother or grandmother in ill health, from www.lords-prayer-words.com)


N., I lay my hands upon you in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, beseeching our Lord Jesus Christ to sustain you with his presence,
to drive away all sickness of body and spirit,
and to give you that victory of life and peace which will enable you to serve him both now and evermore.

Amen.


N., I lay my hands upon you in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ,
beseeching him to uphold you and fill you with his grace,
that you may know the healing power of his love.

Amen.


(Source: 1979 Book of Common Prayer, Protestant Episcopal Church in the USA)


May you be wrapped up in God's love,
Found deep in His everlasting wings,
Carried and kept, safe and cherished.
May the healing power of Christ
Breathe across your being now.

www.lords-prayer-words.com



prayers for a sick friend, mother or father can be found at prayerscapes.





Here are some tips to help you best comfort someone in the hospital. The get well soon wishes for heart surgery ensures a speedy recovery for the concerned .

Reply to Get Well Soon Messages

wishes for hospitalized person

Case Scenario

L.S. is a 70-year-old man with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He is intubated and unconscious in the intensive care unit with pneumonia complicated further by acute renal failure. His advance directive, completed seven years ago when he was highly functional, indicates that he wants life-sustaining treatments. He has not updated his advance directive since that time. Members of the medical team are concerned that he has little chance of surviving this hospital stay, and if he were to survive, he is at high risk of significant cognitive deficits that would require long-term skilled nursing care. The patient's wife is listed as his health care agent in his advance directive. She asks how she should proceed with decision making as she struggles to balance what she thinks would be in her husband's best interest and what he has indicated in his advance directive.

Commentary

Clinicians and surrogates can be faced with challenging decisions when a patient loses the capacity to participate in medical decision making. A significant number of hospitalized and critically ill adults lose decision-making capacity during hospital stays and cannot make treatment decisions.1–4 A systematic review of the effect of decision making on surrogates found that at least one-third of surrogates experienced significant emotional burden when making medical decisions.5 The most common negative effects cited were stress when making decisions, guilt over the decisions made, and doubt regarding whether they had made the right decisions.5 For some surrogates, the burden of decision making persisted for months or even years.5

In many cases, advance directives can help guide decision making, yet in some cases, directives may be vague or conflict with what clinicians or surrogates view is in the patient's best interest.6  For clinicians, it can be challenging to guide surrogates through the decision-making process while attempting to balance the best interest of the patient and avoiding significant negative emotional impact on the surrogate. Clinicians can strike this balance by (1) knowing the key elements of advance care planning that can be conducted with patients before they lose decision-making capacity and (2) having an approach to medical decision making in place for when patients lose decision-making capacity and their previously expressed wishes appear to conflict with best interest. Key terms for navigating decision making at the end of life are defined in Table 1.7–9

ADVANCE CARE PLANNING

Advance care planning involves meeting with patients and their surrogates to ensure a shared understanding of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment options, and relevant values and goals, and to establish plans for future treatment that work toward a patient's goals.7 Although the focus of advance care planning is a high-quality conversation rather than just the creation of a static document, the discussion needs to be accurately documented.8 A written advance directive or Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) form can be prepared to document aspects of the advance care planning discussions. Because advance care planning is a dynamic process, these documents should be reviewed and updated accordingly.

One of the most important functions of a written advance directive is designation of a surrogate decision maker. Clinicians can guide patients in choosing an appropriate surrogate who knows the patient well, can make decisions in stressful situations and crises, and makes decisions according to the patient's preferences or best interest rather than his or her own desires.10 Studies have shown that surrogates' predictions of patient preference often mirror their own preferences11; therefore, clinicians can encourage patients to select a surrogate with similar values and preferences.

Once a surrogate has been chosen, it is important for patients to communicate their goals, values, and treatment preferences to this individual. Clinicians can refer patients to a number of decision aids to guide them in this process.12 Encouraging patients to discuss goals, values, and treatment preferences with their surrogate is important to guide decision making in clinical situations that have not been anticipated, previously discussed, or documented in an advance directive form. If the patient chooses to complete a living will outlining specific treatment preferences, the clinician should discuss and document how strictly the patient would like written choices to be followed and how much leeway he or she would like the surrogate to have in decision making.6,11 Knowing how much leeway patients have given their surrogate can help determine what should be done in situations when an advance directive contradicts what appears to be in the best interest of the patient.

WHEN PREVIOUSLY EXPRESSED WISHES CONFLICT WITH BEST INTERESTS

A five-question framework has been proposed to help clinicians determine whether to focus on the patient's previously expressed wishes or on the current best interest of the patient.6

1. Does the urgency of the clinical situation require a time-sensitive decision, are the patient's previously expressed wishes clear, and are POLST documents completed and available?6 In emergency situations when clear orders are present (e.g., POLST form), the clinician should follow the expressed wishes of the patient. In nonemergency or emergency situations without clear orders, the clinician should determine with the surrogate what would be in the best interest of the patient. In the case of L.S., the clinical situation is urgent yet not emergent and clear orders are not present. This favors a discussion with the patient's wife about the values and experiences that led her husband to choose life-sustaining treatment, which will help determine what would be in his best interest.

2. Considering the patient's preferences and goals of care, are the burdens of the intervention likely to overshadow the benefits?6 When benefits of an intervention are weak or unlikely, and/or burdens are strong or likely, given the patient's values and goals, the framework recommends against the intervention. When benefits of an intervention are strong and likely, and/or burdens are weak and unlikely, given the patient's values and goals, the framework recommends in favor of the intervention. Discussing L.S.' goals and values with his wife can help determine whether to follow his advance directive or whether his wife should override the document to act in his best interest. If L.S. valued functional independence and had strong preferences about remaining at home rather than in long-term skilled nursing care, the benefits of continued hospitalization would be unlikely and the burdens would be strong. In light of these goals and values, it would be appropriate for L.S.' wife to override her husband's advance directive and make treatment decisions that would honor his preferences.

3. Is the advance directive appropriate in the current situation?6 In situations where the advance directive fits well, the framework recommends favoring previously expressed orders. In situations where the advance directive fits poorly, the framework recommends favoring the best interest of the patient. L.S.' advance directive may not fit the situation at hand because it was written seven years ago when he was fully functional. This situation favors a discussion with L.S.' wife about what would represent his best interest. Investigating and respecting L.S.' values and goals may be better for approximating what he would choose than previously stated preferences that may have been meant for different circumstances.6

4. How much leeway does the surrogate have to interpret the patient's advance directive?6 If the patient has not granted the surrogate leeway in decision making, the framework recommends favoring previously expressed orders. If the patient has granted the surrogate leeway in decision making, the framework recommends favoring the best interest of the patient. Some advance directive forms allow patients to specify if they would like their directive to be followed strictly or to serve as a general guide for their surrogate. When leeway is not indicated, what is known about the patient's previous values and goals needs to provide a compelling reason to modify directives.6 In L.S.' case, there was no indication of his leeway preferences, and his advance directive is vague; therefore, it would be appropriate for the clinician to investigate L.S.' goals and values with his wife to determine appropriate recommendations.

5. Is the surrogate acting in the patient's best interests?6 When the surrogate represents the patient's best interest poorly or represents his or her own interest, the framework recommends favoring previously expressed orders. When the surrogate represents the patient's best interest, the framework recommends favoring the best interest of the patient. In some cases, surrogates' emotional attachment may be so strong that they are unable to place the patient's best interest above their own.6 If L.S.' wife stated that she could not let her husband go, the clinician would first need to address her emotions and anticipatory grief before talking with her to determine what would be in her husband's best interest.6 The authors of this framework also encourage clinicians to recognize possible conflicts of interest, such as the surrogate's expressed desire to receive a pension or inheritance. To mitigate bias that may stem from these situations, they advise the clinician to consult with an ethics expert or contact adult protective services.6

Enlarge Print

Table 1.

Key Terms for End-of-Life Decision Making

Advance care planning involves meeting with patients and their surrogates to ensure a shared understanding of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment options, and relevant values and goals, and to establish plans for future treatment that work toward a patient's goals.7

Advance directives are the written expression, recorded on any type of document, of a patient's preferences for medical care at the end of life.

There are two general categories of directives:

1. Substantive directives, such as living wills, communicate patients' stated values and treatment preferences should they become incapacitated.8

2. Process directives, such as health care proxies (also known as health care power of attorney, durable power of attorney for health care, etc.), are used by patients to state whom they choose to make their decisions should they become incapacitated.8

POLST paradigm is an approach to end-of-life planning emphasizing conversations and shared decision making about the care a patient would like to receive at the end of his or her life. A POLST form then translates the shared decisions into actionable medical orders. Only patients with serious illness or frailty who are unlikely to live longer than one year should have one. An advance directive is more appropriate to make future end-of-life care wishes known.9

Surrogate decision maker is an advocate for a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. This can be someone the patient has appointed in a durable power of attorney for health care document or, if the patient has not appointed someone, a default person according to a hierarchy usually specified by state law.

Table 1.

Key Terms for End-of-Life Decision Making

Advance care planning involves meeting with patients and their surrogates to ensure a shared understanding of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment options, and relevant values and goals, and to establish plans for future treatment that work toward a patient's goals.7

Advance directives are the written expression, recorded on any type of document, of a patient's preferences for medical care at the end of life.

There are two general categories of directives:

1. Substantive directives, such as living wills, communicate patients' stated values and treatment preferences should they become incapacitated.8

2. Process directives, such as health care proxies (also known as health care power of attorney, durable power of attorney for health care, etc.), are used by patients to state whom they choose to make their decisions should they become incapacitated.8

POLST paradigm is an approach to end-of-life planning emphasizing conversations and shared decision making about the care a patient would like to receive at the end of his or her life. A POLST form then translates the shared decisions into actionable medical orders. Only patients with serious illness or frailty who are unlikely to live longer than one year should have one. An advance directive is more appropriate to make future end-of-life care wishes known.9

Surrogate decision maker is an advocate for a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. This can be someone the patient has appointed in a durable power of attorney for health care document or, if the patient has not appointed someone, a default person according to a hierarchy usually specified by state law.

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Letter to a Friend Who Is Hospitalized

wishes for hospitalized person

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I received a message that you are currently in the hospital and I feel sad I heard from someone that you got sick and I want you to know that I.

In Good Times and Bad Times | Birthday Wishes in Difficult Circumstances

wishes for hospitalized person

When you’re writing a get well card it’s important to select your words wisely. Your well wishes have the power to aid in someone’s recovery and bring a smile to their face. By shining light on the positives and looking to the future you will make someone feel better with your kind words, but it’s not always easy to know exactly what to say. Before you fill the blank space of your greeting card, you’ll need to consider three things: the person you are writing to, your relationship with them, and the condition they are in. Whether you’re looking for inspirational quotes, get well wishes after surgery, or funny get well wishes to lift spirits, we have you covered with everything you need to know about what to write in a get well card below.

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What To Write In A Get Well Card

Writing thoughtful get well wishes and adding inspiring get well soon quotes to your greeting card is the best way to show someone you are thinking of them during a tough time. Remember that personalization is key and a heartfelt get well soon message can do so much more than any other gift.

1. Use A Warm Greeting To Start Your Get Well Sentiment

Take into consideration who you are writing to as well as circumstance. Both of these details are important and will set the tone for your message. “Dear” is a safe standby, but you can choose to go with a warmer greeting if you are writing to friends, family or others you may have close relationships with.

2. Write A Few Get Well Wishes

Start your card off with well wishes that are specific to what the recipient is going through. Adding statements that instill hope and optimism will be a fundamental part of helping someone heal. Don’t dwell on the negatives, make sure that your wishes stay positive, upbeat and have the power to inspire.

3. Express Your Love In Get Well Messages

If you are close to the card recipient, write a get well saying that expresses your love and gratefulness. Add an anecdote or inside joke that the two of you share to ensure you will bring a smile to their face. It’s also easier to write a funny get well wish and add humor to the greeting card if you and the recipient are close.

4. If Religious, Send Prayers in Get Well Messages

If you share a religious bond with the card recipient, let them know that they are in your prayers. It can be encouraging for someone going through something serious to know that they are in your prayers. Shining light on the faith you share is another way to show your compassion.

5. Use Get Well Quotes

Use quotes to offer encouragement. Change someone’s habits, mind and emotions with an inspirational quote they can identify with during a difficult time. Don’t be afraid to borrow a few words from an award winning author or inspirational figure. Quotes are the perfect way to offer encouragement.

6. Remind Them You’re Thinking of Them

Tell them you’re thinking about them. Letting someone know that they are in your thoughts provides a sense of love and support for someone who is going through a hard time. Comforting words can make all the difference to your get well card message.

7. Be Empathetic

Try to understand this person’s feelings or emotions and make sure that your message and tone reflect that. Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes will help you find the right words to say. Avoid overthinking this part of your message and don’t let the fear of saying the wrong thing cause you to say nothing at all. However, do your best to avoid minimizing what the person is going through just because you may be able to relate.

8. Offer Your Support

When someone gets ill or becomes injured, even day to day activities become difficult to do. If you have the time and opportunity to help out in any way, offer to do so in your get well soon card. Some ideas include helping out with meals, cleaning up around the house, offering childcare or anything else that you see fit for the situation. In most situations, people won’t ask for help so you offering to do so is a great way to show that you care. Be specific when you are offering to help out and make sure that you follow through with what you’ve offered.

9. Sign Off With A Warm Closing

You’ll want to close your get well card with a warm closing. For example: “thinking of you”, “take care” and “wishing you healing” are all perfect ways to wrap up your card.

Get Well Wishes

Common get well wishes include mentioning hopes for feeling better, speedy recovery messages, and words that let the card recipient know that you are thinking of them. Short and sweet get well wishes are the perfect thing to write in a get well soon card for any recipient. Use one of the wishes below or try combining a few to create a longer and more meaningful message.

Examples for Get Well Wishes:

  • Feel better soon!
  • Hope you feel better soon.
  • Hoping you find strength with each new day. You are in our thoughts.
  • Have a speedy recovery!
  • I hope each new day brings you closer to a full and speedy recovery!
  • May good health envelop you, spurring a quick recovery.
  • Thinking of you lots and hoping for your speedy recovery.
  • We’re all thinking about you and wishing you a speedy recovery.
  • Hang in there, better days are coming.
  • Hope you feel a little better every day.
  • Sending good, healthy vibes your way.
  • Sending hugs and love!
  • Remember to just take it one day at a time and in no time, you will be completely healthy and smiling once again.
  • You’re in all of our warmest thoughts as you recover from your accident.
  • Best wishes for a little progress and a little encouragement everyday during your recuperation.
  • Best wishes that you will soon be back to doing all the things you love.
  • May the good wishes and warm thoughts of those who care about you send a little cheerfulness into your world and help you feel better.

Religious Get Well Wishes And Verses

Adding religious get well wishes or verses to your get well note is a great way to share your faith and encourage someone in their spirits during difficult times. These well wishes serve as a shining light that can often provide a sense of personal comfort when someone is struggling. Try out one of the religious sentiments below and let your card provide a source of strength to those who could use a few words of encouragement.

Examples of Religious Get Well Wishes:

  • Praying for you!
  • You are in my thoughts and prayers during your time of recovery.
  • As I close my eyes to pray every night, my only request is that God will heal you speedily. I wish you a quick recovery!
  • Thoughtful prayers are being sent your way with the hopes that you will feel better soon.
  • Thinking of you during this time of illness, and praying you will find strength in the Lord and his never ending supply of love.
  • God cares and hears our prayers, and I am praying for you today!
  • Know God promises to give strength when you need it and that we are praying for you to have strength and peace as you face health challenges.
WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: Get Well Soon Message - Sweet Get Well Wishes for a Friend or Loved One

A resident had signed the protocol indicating a wish not to go to the hospital. It was further unclear whether the staff person knew of the resident's wish.

wishes for hospitalized person
Written by Kazralrajas
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