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I wish i would die quotes
July 16, 2019 Anniversary Wishes for Wife 3 comments

God please kill me! Take my life and let me die! Do you ever wish God would simply kill you? Do you sometimes feel so tired of this life that you.

A part of life and the hardest when it’s someone dear, these death quotes can provide you solace in your time of grieving. If you know someone that is after the recent loss of a loved one, share these insightful quotes about death to help them in their time of suffering.

Death is one of the most difficult things that any of us will have to deal with in our lives.

It is personal, unique, and very different from person to person.

Often times, people will judge the way someone else grieves because it is not the same as the way that they would personally mourn.

Some folks even go as far as to assume that someone is NOT anguished (by their definition), because they do not show it in a way that fits into this individual’s view of what grief should look like.

Here are some thoughts and quotes about death, as well as the unique view we each take of it.

Inspirational Death Quotes About Mourning

1.) “Guilt is perhaps the most painful companion to death.”- Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

2.) “You will lose someone you can’t live without, and your heart will be badly broken, and the bad news is that you never completely get over the loss of your beloved. But this is also the good news.

They live forever in your broken heart that doesn’t seal back up. And you come through. It’s like having a broken leg that never heals perfectly — that still hurts when the weather gets cold, but you learn to dance with the limp.” – Anne Lamott

3.) “There is something you must always remember. you are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.”- Winnie the Pooh

4.) “If I can see pain in your eyes, then share with me your tears. If I can see joy in your eyes, then share with me your smile.” – Santosh Kalwar

5.) “Deep grief sometimes is almost like a specific location, a coordinate on a map of time. When you are standing in that forest of sorrow, you cannot imagine that you could ever find your way to a better place.

But if someone can assure you that they themselves have stood in that same place, and now have moved on, sometimes this will bring hope.” – Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love

6.) “And we wept that one so lovely should have a life so brief.” – William Cullen Bryant

7.) “There is an hour, a minute – you will remember it forever – when you know instinctively on the basis of the most inconsequential evidence, that something is wrong.

You don’t know – can’t know – that it is the first of a series of “wrongful” events that will culminate in the utter devastation of your life as you have known it.”- Joyce Carol Oates, A Widow’s Story

8.) “When a friend of Abigail and John Adams was killed at Bunker Hill, Abigail’s response was to write a letter to her husband and include these words, ‘My bursting heart must find vent at my pen.’” – David McCullough

9.) “A feeling of pleasure or solace can be so hard to find when you are in the depths of your grief. Sometimes it’s the little things that help get you through the day.

You may think your comforts sound ridiculous to others, but there is nothing ridiculous about finding one little thing to help you feel good in the midst of pain and sorrow!” – Elizabeth Berrien, Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope 

Beautiful Yet Profound Sayings and Quotes about Death

10.) “When your fear touches someone’s pain, it becomes pity. When your love touches someone’s pain, it becomes compassion.” – Stephen Levine

11.) “Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary.

The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we are not alone.”- Fred Rogers

12.) “The reality is that we don’t forget, move on, and have closure. But rather we honor, we remember, and incorporate our deceased children and siblings into our lives in a new way. In fact, keeping memories of your loved one alive in your mind and heart is an important part of your healing journey.” – Harriet Schiff, author of The Bereaved Parent

13.) “What we have once enjoyed deeply we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes a part of us.” – Helen Keller

14.) “She was no longer wrestling with the grief, but could sit down with it as a lasting companion and make it a sharer in her thoughts.” – George Eliot

15.) “Three things in human life are important: The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.” – Henry James

16.) “We can endure much more than we think we can; all human experience testifies to that. All we need to do is learn not to be afraid of pain. Grit your teeth and let it hurt. Don’t deny it, don’t be overwhelmed by it. It will not last forever. One day, the pain will be gone and you will still be there.” – Harold Kushner, When All You’ve Ever Wanted Isn’t Enough

17.) “Only people who are capable of loving strongly can also suffer great sorrow, but this same necessity of loving serves to counteract their grief and heals them.” – Leo Tolstoy

18.) “Honest listening is one of the best medicines we can offer the dying and the bereaved.” – Jean Cameron (dying of cancer)

Helpful Quotes About Death of A Loved One

19.) “When he died, all things soft and beautiful and bright would be buried with him.” ― Madeline Miller, The Song of Achilles

20.) “But she wasn’t around, and that’s the thing when your parents die, you feel like instead of going into every fight with backup, you are going into every fight alone.” ― Mitch Albom, For One More Day

21.) “Sadly enough, the most painful goodbyes are the ones that are left unsaid and never explained.”
Jonathan Harnisch, Freak

22.) “The death of a beloved is an amputation.” — C. S. Lewis

23.) “For as long as the world spins and the earth is green with new wood, she will lie in this box and not in my arms. “— Lurlene McDaniel

24.) “If the people we love are stolen from us, the way to have them live on is to never stop loving them.” —James O’Barr

25.) “When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.“ – Kahlil Gibran

26.) “Unable are the loved to die. For love is immortality.” – Emily Dickinson

27.) “Perhaps they are not the stars, but rather openings in Heaven where the love of our lost ones pours through and shines down upon us to let us know they are happy.” – Unknown

28.) “What is lovely never dies, but passes into other loveliness.” – Thomas Bailey

More Uplifting Death Quotes

29.) “You give yourself permission to grieve by recognizing the need for grieving. Grieving is the natural way of working through the loss of a love. Grieving is not weakness nor absence of faith. Grieving is as natural as crying when you are hurt, sleeping when you are tired or sneezing when your nose itches. It is nature’s way of healing a broken heart.” – Doug Manning

30.) “For some moments in life there are no words.”- David Seltzer, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971 film adaptation)

30.) “Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live.” – Norman Cousins

31.) “One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it’s worth watching.” – Unknown

32.) “Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live.” – Henry van Dyke

33.) “It is as natural to die as it is to be born.” – Francis Bacon

34.) “All men think that all men are mortal but themselves.” – Edward Young

35.) “To fear death is to misunderstand life.” – Unknown

Comforting quotes about death

36.) “Why should I fear death? If I am, death is not. If death is, I am not. Why should I fear that which cannot exist when I do?”—Epicurus

37.) “If life must not be taken too seriously, then so neither must death”—Samuel Butler

38.) “Death can come at any age, but the pride of life fools a person into thinking that day is far away.” – John Buttrick

39.) “None of us knows the day of our death. However, if we knew that death is actually our acquisition, we would remove the fear of death from our lives.” – Sunday Adelaja

40.) “It is the secret of the world that all things subsist and do not die, but retire a little from sight and afterwards return again.”—Ralph Waldo Emerson

41.) “Death is but a door, time is but a window. I’ll be back!”—Ghostbusters II

42.) “Death is nature’s way of saying, ‘Your table is ready.’”— Robin Williams

43.) “Men fear death, as if unquestionably the greatest evil, and yet no man knows that it may not be the greatest good.” – William Mitford

44.) “I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.”— Mark Twain

45.) “The truth I have been seeking — this truth is Death. Yet Death is also a seeker. Forever seeking me. So — we have met at last. And I am prepared. I am at peace.”— Bruce Lee

Quotes about death of a friend

46.) “We go to the grave of a friend saying, “A man is dead,” but angels throng about him saying, “A man is born.” – Henry Ward Beecher

47.) “The death of a friend is equivalent to the loss of a limb.” – German Proverb

48.) “Those we love never truly leave us, Harry. There are things that death cannot touch.” ― Jack Thorne

49.) “But fate ordains that dearest friends must part.” – Edward Young

50.) “This passion, and the death of a dear friend, would go near to make a man look sad.” – William Shakespeare

51.) “Even the best of friends cannot attend each other’s funeral.” – Kehlog Albran

52.) “You cannot stop loving your friend because he’s dead, especially if he was better than anyone alive, you know?”-Jerome Salinger

53.) “When our friends are alive, we see the good qualities they lack; dead, we remember only those they possessed.” – Jean Antoine Petit-Senn

Inspirational quotes about death

54.) “If you ever lose someone dear to you, never say the words they’re gone. They’ll come back.” ― Prince

55.) “How can the dead be truly dead when they still live in the souls of those who are left behind?”—Carson McCullers

56.) “Death is a challenge. It tells us not to waste time. It tells us to tell each other right now that we love each other.” Leo Buscaglia

57.) “We all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.”— Chuck Palahniuk

58.) “I am prepared to meet my Maker. Whether my Maker is prepared for the great ordeal of meeting me is another matter.”— Winston Churchill

59.) “Death is something inevitable. When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace.”— Nelson Mandela

60.) “Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.”— Steve Jobs

Quotes about death to bring you calm

61.) “No one really knows why they are alive until they know what they’d die for.” – Martin Luther King Jr

62.) “I’m not afraid of death because I don’t believe in it. It’s just getting out of one car, and into another.” – John Lennon

63.) “A fact of life we all die. But the positive impact you have on others will be a living legacy.” – Catherine Pulsifer

64.) “I want to be thoroughly used up when I die for the harder I work the more I live. I rejoice in life for its own sake.” – George Bernard Shaw

65.) “No one here gets out alive.” – Jim Morrison

66.) “Death is an ending. Death is a closing. Death is idle words in the ebb and flow of life.”- Elizabeth Edwards

67.) “To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” – Thomas Campbell

68.) “Life asked death, ‘Why do people love me but hate you?’ Death responded, ‘Because you are a beautiful lie and I am a painful truth.”—Author unknown

69.) “I would rather die a meaningful death than to live a meaningless life.” –Corazon Aquino

70.) “I am not afraid of death, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.” – Woody Allen

Death quotes to calm you

71.) “While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.” – Leonardo da Vinci

72.) “Death is not the end of life; it is the beginning of an eternal journey.” – Debasish Mridha

73.) “Not only is death inevitable; death is necessary for us to inherit the new life we are to enjoy in Christ.” – Max Lucado

74.) “Death is nothing else but going home to God, the bond of love will be unbroken for all eternity.” – Mother Teresa

75.) “To die will be an awfully big adventure.” – Peter Pan

76.) “Death is only the end if you assume the story is about you”—Welcome to Night Vale

77.) “The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and the other begins?”—Edgar Allan Poe

78.) “Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.” –Napoleon Bonaparte

79.) “Life is for the living. Death is for the dead. Let life be like music. And death a note unsaid.” – Langston Hughes

80.) “Good men must die, but death cannot kill their names.” – Proverb

Profound death quotes for loved ones

81.) “The idea is to die young as late as possible.” – Ashley Montagu

82.) “Life is like a very short visit to a toy shop between birth and death.” – Desmond Morris

83.) “It is nothing to die. It is frightful not to live.” – Victor Hugo

84.) “The day which we fear as our last is but the birthday of eternity.” – Seneca

85.) “As soon as you’ll realize that it was a gift, you’ll be free.” – Maxime Lagacé

86.) “Death is not the biggest fear we have; our biggest fear is taking the risk to be alive – the risk to be alive and express what we really are.” – Miguel Angel Ruiz

87.) “There is only one god and his name is Death, and there is only one thing we say to Death: ‘Not today’.” – Syrio Forel

89.) “After your death, you will be what you were before your birth.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

90.) “Death ends a life, not a relationship.” – Mitch Albom

More quotes about death to make you strong

91.) “Life is too short when you think of the length of death.”― Sean Mangan

92.) “Death, so called, is a thing which makes men weep, And yet a third of life is passed in sleep.”― Lord George Gordon Byron

93.) “We are born in one day. We die in one day. We can change in one day. And we can fall in love in one day. Anything can happen in just one day.”― Gayle Forman

94“The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our separate ways, I to die, and you to live. Which of these two is better only God knows.”
― Socrates

95.) “She had been given a wonderful gift: life. Sometimes it was cruelly taken away too soon, but it’s what you did with it that counted, not how long it lasted.”― Cecelia Ahern

96.) “You were born a child of light’s wonderful secret— you return to the beauty you have always been.”― Aberjhani

97.) “It never gets easier, missing you. And sometimes I wonder if it ever will.”― Heather Brewer

98.) “The dead could only speak through the mouths of those left behind, and through the signs they left scattered behind them.”― Robert Galbraith

99.) “Last words are always harder to remember when no one knows that someone’s about to die.”― John Green

100.) “Death is unstoppable. One must face it as a fact of life.”― D. Aswini

101.) “Everybody know death is inevitably coming , but it never fails to catch everybody by surprise everytime one is going.”― Hlovate

102.) “It’s not contagious, you know. Death is as natural as life. It’s part of the deal we made.”― Mitch Albom

103.) “It’s all God’s will: you can die in your sleep, and God can spare you in battle.”― Leo Tolstoy

104.) “Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist.”― Epicurus

105.) “When the time comes to die, make sure that all you have to do is die!”― Jim Elliot

What do you think about these quotes about death?

Something we should all remember is that each and everyone of us grieves in a different way.

Each one of us has a different memory and relationship with the person who has passed away.

While some grieve openly, (others keep it to themselves) and put on a stoic face.

The important lesson to learn is that death and grief are very unique and individual processes. What is right for us may not fit another.

Hopefully, these quotes about death will help you embrace and grieve as you need to, and let others do the same.

What do you think about these death quotes? Do you have any other inspirational quotes to add? Let us know in the comment section below.

Suicide Quotes and Sayings: I'm not okay, I'm just good at pretending I am. Suicide does not People do not die from Suicide. They die due to sadness. 233 . Most of the time I wish I was dead. Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee ?.

Top five regrets of the dying

i wish i would die quotes

It's often been claimed that "No one died wishing they spent more time at the office."

That doesn't comport with some of my friends and colleagues. But that's anecdotal so, for this article, I reviewed all 3,500 entries in the book, Last Words of Notable People.

While many people's last words are religious, about their spouse, ending their pain, or that dying feels good, enough speak about wishing they could work more to cast doubt on, "No one died wishing they spent more time at the office." 

Whether or not we choose to work more, it certainly seems we should be more accepting of diversity of how people choose to live their lives rather than pathologize work-centric people as "workaholic" or "out of balance."  Indeed, per my anecdotal experience and the names on the following list, many highly contributory people, already lifelong hard workers, wished they had worked more or could work more.

Of course, people with less potential for accomplishment might well feel that work-life balance is wiser. 

In any event, here are two dozen people's last words that suggest they wish they had "spent more time at the office" or at least that work, not pleasure, relationships, nor spirituality, was on their mind at that final moment

Isaac Babel, Russian anti-Stalin activist: "I am only asking for one thing--Let me finish my work."

George Beard, American physician: "I hope others will carry on my work."

Olavo Bilac, Brazilian activist and writer: "Get me coffee. I'm going to write."

Jerry Boyd, U.S. boxer and writer: "Doc, get me a little more time. I gotta finish my book."

Francois-Paul Brueys d'Aigalliers, French admiral: "An admiral ought to die giving orders."

Buddha: "Strive with earnestness."

Robert Burton, Oxford University Vicar: "Be not idle."

George Catlin, American artist:  "What will happen to my gallery?"

Jane Arminda Delano, American nurse: "What about my work? I must get back to my work!"

Louis Desaix de Veygoux, French nobleman: "My only regret in dying is to have perished before having done enough to live in the recollection of posterity."

Edith Hamilton, American historian: "I haven't felt up to writing but now I think I am going to finish that book on Plato."

Sidney Herbert, British statesman: "I have not done all I wished..."

Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese artist: "If Heaven had only granted me five more years, I could have become a real painter."

Hubert Humphrey, U.S. Vice President: "I feel I have so much to do yet."

Albert Michelson, American physicist:: "The following is a report on the measurement of the velocity of light made at the Irvine..."

Edmund Husserl, German philosopher: "Oh, I've seen something wonderful. Quick, write it down!"

Guillaume Lekeu, Belgian composer. "So many works unfinished---My quartet!"

Huey Long, Governor of Louisiana: "Don't let me die. I have so much to do."

Maria Montessori, founder of Montessori schools, at 81: "Am I no longer of use?"

Pablo Picasso at 91: "And now I must go back to work." He painted that night until 3 AM and then died.

Pope Pius XI at 82 having been pope for 17 years: "I still have so many things to do."

Charles Sumner, abolitionist: "You must take care of the bill, my bill, the great civil rights bill, and don't let it fail!"

Elisabeth Ten Boom,  World War II Dutch resistance figure: "So much work to do."

Osamu Tezuka, Japanese manga artist: "I'm begging you, let me work!"

What do I hope my last words will be? "Barbara, I love you. And keep doing true good, lots of true good."

Source: Pexels, Public Domain

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Most People Would Die Sooner Than Think—In Fact, They Do So

i wish i would die quotes

Death is the permanent cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living, physical organism. Death may refer to the end of life as either an event or condition. In many cultures and in the arts, death is considered a being or otherwise personified, wherein it is usually capitalized as "Death".

A[edit]

  • Death is a black camel, which kneels at the gates of all.
  • Abd-el-Kader, as reported in The Cyclopædia of Practical Quotations edited by Jehiel Keeler Hoyt (1882), p. 79
  • Call no man happy till he is dead.
  • Æschylus, Agamemnon, 938. Earliest reference. Also in Sophocles—Trachiniæ, and Œdipus Tyrannus
  • It is written that the last enemy to be vanquished is death. We should begin early in life to vanquish this enemy by obliterating every trace of the fear of death from our minds. Then can we turn to life and fill the whole horizon of our souls with it, turn with added zest to all the serious tasks which it imposes and to the pure delights which here and there it affords.
  • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation
  • Let us learn from the lips of death the lessons of life. Let us live truly while we live, live for what is true and good and lasting. And let the memory of our dead help us to do this. For they are not wholly separated from us, if we remain loyal to them. In spirit they are with us. And we may think of them as silent, invisible, but real presences in our households.
  • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation
  • The bitter, yet merciful, lesson which death teaches us is to distinguish the gold from the tinsel, the true values from the worthless chaff.
    The terrible events of life are great eye-openers. They force us to learn that which it is wholesome for us to know, but which habitually we try to ignore — namely, that really we have no claim on a long life; that we are each of us liable to be called off at any moment, and that the main point is not how long we live, but with what meaning we fill the short allotted span — for short it is at best.
  • Felix Adler, Life and Destiny (1913), Section 8: Suffering and Consolation
  • In keeping with their opinion, scholars have proposed the ingenious consolation: “Man begins to die from the moment of his birth”—a scanty and funereal comfort. But We say that man is eternally being born, and particularly at the moment of so-called death. The servitors of distorted religions encourage their wards in the purchase of places in the cemetery, where through their advance arrangements they will lie more advantageously and honorably than others more indigent and hence undeserving of lengthy prayers. The incense for these poor ones will be adulterated and the prayers abominably sung. Ask people, finally, what authentic Teaching has enjoined this monstrous practice? Verily, we have had enough of graves, cemeteries, and intimidations! One may know how loftily the Teachers have regarded the transition to future manifestations, and least of all have They been concerned about a cemetery site.
    The attitude toward death is a very important indicator of the character of the Teaching, for in it is contained the understanding of reincarnation. I urge you to consider reincarnation strictly scientifically. If you can propound any other structure of the universe, We shall reserve for you a chair as professor of theology and promise you a first-class funeral; for indeed in the eyes of the enlightened you will have already decided to die. Read attentively the writings of the Teachers... and you will be amazed at how unanimously in all ages They speak about the change of life. The Path of Light will appear when you venture to look scientifically and without prejudices. 334.
    • Agni Yoga, Leaves of Morya’s Garden II, (1925)
  • But when the sun in all his state,
    Illumed the eastern skies,
    She passed through glory's morning gate,
    And walked in Paradise.
  • James Aldrich, A Death Bed, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Somewhere, in desolate, wind-swept space,
    In twilight land, in no man's land,
    Two hurrying shapes met face to face
    And bade each other stand.
    "And who are you?" cried one, a-gape,
    Shuddering in the glimmering light.
    "I know not," said the second shape,
    "I only died last night."
  • The white sail of his soul has rounded
    The promontory—death.
  • William Alexander, The Icebound Ship, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Every breath you take is a step towards death.
  • In its flight from death, the craving for permanence clings to the very things sure to be lost in death.
    • Hannah Arendt, Love and Saint Augustine (1929), edited by Joanna Vecchiarelli Scott and Judith Chelius Stark (Chicago: 1996), p. 17
  • Your lost friends are not dead, but gone before,
    Advanced a stage or two upon that road
    Which you must travel in the steps they trod.
  • Aristophanes, Fragment, II; translation by Cumberland, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • He who died at Azan sends
    This to comfort all his friends:
    Faithful friends! It lies I know
    Pale and white and cold as snow;
    And ye say, "Abdallah's dead!"
    Weeping at the feet and head.
    I can see your falling tears,
    I can hear your sighs and prayers;
    Yet I smile and whisper this:
    I am not the thing you kiss.
    Cease your tears and let it lie;
    It was mine—it is not I.
  • Edwin Arnold, He Who Died at Azan, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Her cabin'd ample spirit,
    It fluttered and fail'd for breath;
    Tonight it doth inherit
    The vasty hall of death.
  • Matthew Arnold, Requiescat, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Our bodies are prisons for our souls. Our skin and blood, the iron bars of confinement. But fear not. All flesh decays. Death turns all to ash. And thus, death frees every soul.
  • Darren Aronofsky, in lines for the Grand Inquisitor Silecio, in The Fountain
  • It is not death that a man should fear, but never beginning to live.

B[edit]

  • Death is a friend of ours; and he that is not ready to entertain him is not at home.
  • Francis Bacon, An Essay on Death published in The Remaines of the Right Honourable Francis Lord Verulam (1648) but may not have been written by Bacon
  • Men fear death, as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other.
  • It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man, so weak, but it mates, and masters, the fear of death; and therefore, death is no such terrible enemy, when a man hath so many attendants about him, that can win the combat of him. Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupieth it.
  • I have often thought upon death, and I find it the least of all evils.
  • Pompa mortis magis terret quam mors ipsa.
    The pomp of death alarms us more than death itself.
  • Quoted by Francis Bacon as from Seneca, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other.
  • Francis Bacon, Essays, Of Death, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • What then remains, but that we still should cry
    Not to be born, or being born to die.
  • Ascribed to Francis Bacon; paraphrase of a Greek epigram, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • The next two hundred years will see the abolition of death, as we now understand that great transition, and the establishing of the soul's existence. The soul will be known as an entity, as the motivating impulse, and the spiritual centre back of all manifested forms. . . . Our essential immortality will be demonstrated and realised to be a fact in nature.
    • Alice Bailey, Esoteric Psychology II, p. 96 (1936), Esoteric Healing, p. 412 (1953)
  • With that inner conviction (of immortality), we face death, and we know that we shall live again, that we come and we go, and that we persist because we are divine and the controllers of our own destiny. We know that we have set ourselves a goal, and that the goal is "Life more abundantly" - somewhere, here, there, and eventually everywhere... The spirit in man is undying; it forever endures, progressing from point to point, and stage to stage upon the Path of Evolution, unfolding steadily and sequentially the divine attributes and aspects... The immortality of the human soul, and the innate ability of the spiritual, inner man to work out his own salvation under the Law of Rebirth, in response to the Law of Cause and Effect, are the underlying factors governing all human conduct and all human aspiration. They condition him at all times, until he has achieved the desired and the designed perfection, and can manifest on earth as a rightly functioning son of God.
    • Alice Bailey, The Reappearance of the Christ, p. 146/147, (1947)
  • The young forget, and rightly forget, the inevitability of that final symbolic detachment which we call Death. But when life has played its part, and age has taken its toll of interests and strength, the tired and world-weary man has no fear of the detaching process, and seeks not to hold on to that which earlier was desired. He welcomes death, and relinquishes willingly that which earlier engrossed his attention.
  • Death, as the human consciousness understands it, pain and sorrow, loss and disaster, joy and distress, are only such because man, as yet, identifies himself with the life of the form and not with the life and consciousness of the soul...
  • Much good will be brought about through the growing custom to cremate those forms which the indwelling life has vacated; when it is an universal custom, we shall see a definite minimising of disease, leading to longevity and increased vitality. p. 249
    If delay is necessary from family feeling or municipal requirements, cremation should follow death within thirty-six hours; where no reason for delay exists, cremation can be rightly permitted in twelve hours. It is wise, however, to wait twelve hours in order to ensure true death. p.485
  • The problem of death or the art of dying. This is something which all seriously ill people must inevitably face, and for which those in good health should prepare themselves, through correct thinking and sane anticipation. The morbid attitude of the majority of men to the subject of death, and their refusal to consider it when in good health, is something which must be altered and deliberately changed. Christ demonstrated to His disciples the correct attitude, when referring to His coming and immediate decease at the hand of His enemies; He chided them when they evidenced sorrow... The fear and the morbidness which the subject of death usually evokes, and the unwillingness to face it with understanding, are due to the emphasis which people lay upon the fact of the physical body, and the facility with which they identify themselves with it; it is based also upon an innate fear of loneliness, and the loss of the familiar. ... After death... the man finds on the other side of the veil those whom he knows, and who have been connected with him in physical plane life, and he is never alone as human beings understand loneliness; he is also conscious of those still in physical bodies; he can see them, he can tune in on their emotions, and also upon their thinking, for the physical brain, being non-existent, no longer acts as a deterrent.
    • Alice Bailey, A Treatise on the Seven Rays: Volume 4: Esoteric Healing (1953) p. 391/3
  • I speak about Death as one who knows... There is no death. There is... entrance into fuller life. There is freedom from the handicaps of the fleshly vehicle. The rending process so much dreaded does not exist, except in the cases of violent and of sudden death, and then the only true disagreeables are an instant and overwhelming sense of imminent peril and destruction, and something closely approaching an electric shock. No more... For the average good citizen, death is a continuance of the living process in his consciousness and a carrying forward of the interests and tendencies of the life. His consciousness and his sense of awareness are the same and unaltered. He does not sense much difference, is well taken care of, and oft is unaware that he has passed through the episode of death. For the wicked and cruelly selfish, for the criminal and for those few who live for the material side only, there eventuates that condition which we call "earth-bound". The links they have forged with earth and the earthward bias of all their desires, force them to remain close to the earth and their last setting in the earth environment. They seek desperately and by every possible means to re-contact it and to re-enter. In a few cases, great personal love for those left behind or the non-fulfilment of a recognised and urgent duty, holds the good and beautiful in a somewhat similar condition.
  • Life hath more awe than death.
  • Death is the universal salt of states;
    Blood is the base of all things — law and war.
  • The death-change comes.
    Death is another life. We bow our heads
    At going out, we think, and enter straight
    Another golden chamber of the king's,
    Larger than this we leave, and lovelier.
    And then in shadowy glimpses, disconnect,
    The story, flower-like, closes thus its leaves.
    The will of God is all in all. He makes,
    Destroys, remakes, for His own pleasure, all.
  • So fades a summer cloud away;
    So sinks the gale when storms are o'er;
    So gently shuts the eye of day;
    So dies a wave along the shore.
  • Anna Letitia Barbauld, The Death of the Virtuous, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • To me the honour is sufficient of belonging to the universe — such a great universe, and so grand a scheme of things. Not even Death can rob me of that honour. For nothing can alter the fact that I have lived; I have been I, if for ever so short a time. And when I am dead, the matter which composes my body is indestructible — and eternal, so that come what may to my 'Soul,' my dust will always be going on, each separate atom of me playing its separate part — I shall still have some sort of a finger in the pie. When I am dead, you can boil me, burn me, drown me, scatter me — but you cannot destroy me: my little atoms would merely deride such heavy vengeance. Death can do no more than kill you.
  • It is only the dead who do not return.
  • Bertrand Barère, speech (1794), as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • When we come to die, we shall be alone. From all our worldly possessions we shall be about to part. Worldly friends — the friends drawn to us by our position, our wealth, or our social qualities, — will leave us as we enter the dark valley. From those bound to us by stronger ties — our kindred, our loved ones, children, brothers, sisters, and from those not less dear to us who have been made our friends because they and we are the friends of the same Saviour, — from them also we must part. Yet not all will leave us. There is One who "sticketh closer than a brother" — One who having loved His own which are in the world loves them to the end.
  • Albert Barnes, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 176
  • To die would be an awfully big adventure.
  • J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • But whether on the scaffold high,
    Or in the battle's van,
    The fittest place where man can die
    Is where he dies for man.
  • Michael J. Barry, The Place to Die, in The Dublin Nation (Sept. 28, 1844), Volume II, p. 809
  • What a power has Death to awe and hush the voices of this earth! How mute we stand when that presence confronts us, and we look upon the silence he has wrought in a human life! We can only gaze, and bow our heads, and creep with our broken, stammering utterances under the shelter of some great word which God has spoken, and in which we see through the history of human sorrow the outstretching and overshadowing of the eternal arms.
  • Walton W. Battershall, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 174
  • To the Christian, these shades are the golden haze which heaven's light makes, when it meets the earth, and mingles with its shadows.
  • Henry Ward Beecher, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 176
  • And when no longer we can see Thee, may we reach out our hands, and find Thee leading us through death to immortality and glory.
  • Henry Ward Beecher, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 179
  • So we fall asleep in Jesus. We have played long enough at the games of life, and at last we feel the approach of death. We are tired out, and we lay our heads back on the bosom of Christ, and quietly fall asleep.
  • Henry Ward Beecher, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 184
  • Dear brethren, our ship is sailing fast. We shall soon hear the rasping of the shallows, and the commotion overhead which bespeaks the port in view. When it comes to that, how will you feel? Are you a stranger, or a convict, or are you going home?
    Brethren, we are all sailing home; and by and by, when we are not thinking of it, some shadowy thing (men call it death), at midnight, will pass by, and will call us by name, and will say, "I have a message for you from home; God wants you; heaven waits for you."
  • Henry Ward Beecher, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 185
  • Some hours after death — generally not more than thirtv-six, it is said — the man draws himself out of the etheric body, leaving it in turn as a senseless corpse, and the latter, remaining near its dense counterpart, shares its fate. If the dense body be buried, the etheric double floats over the grave, slowly disintegrating, and the unpleasant feelings many experience in a churchyard are largely due to the presence of these decaying etheric corpses. If the body be burnt, the etheric double breaks up very quickly, having lost its nidus, its physical centre of attraction, and this is one among many reasons why cremation is preferable to burial as a way of disposing of corpses.
  • Death is only a change that gives the soul a partial liberation, releasing him from the heaviest of his chains. It is but a birth into a wider life, a return after brief exile on earth to the soul's true home, a passing from a prison into the freedom of the upper air. Death is the greatest of earth's illusions; there is no death, but only changes in life-conditions. Life is continuous, unbroken, unbreakable; "unborn, eternal, ancient, constant," it perishes not with the perishing of the bodies that clothe it. We might as well think that the sky is falling when a pot is broken, as imagine that the soul perishes when the body falls to pieces.
  • Suicide is the deliberate or the hurried action of the man who is trying to get out of a trouble and escape from it. Yet he cannot escape from it. He has struck away his body, he is wide awake on the other side of death, exactly the same man he was a moment before, except that his body is thrown off; no more changed than if he had merely taken off his coat. The result of his losing the physical body is that his capacity for suffering is very much increased.
  • The theory of Reincarnation, then, in the Esoteric Philosophy, asserts the existence of a living and individualised Principle, which dwells in and informs the body of a man, and Which, on the death of the body, passes into another body, after a longer or shorter interval. Thus successive bodily lives are linked together like pearls strung upon a thread, the thread being the living Principle, the pearls upon it the separate human lives... In the light of reincarnation life... becomes the school of the eternalMan within us, who seeks therein his development...
  • For certain is death for the born
    And certain is birth for the dead;
    Therefore over the inevitable
    Thou shouldst not grieve.
  • Never the spirit was born, the spirit shall cease to be never. Never was time it was not, end and beginning are dreams.
  • How wilt thou, then, knowing it so,
    --grieve when thou shouldst not grieve?
    How, if thou hearest that the man new-dead
    Is, like the man new-born, still living man--
    One same, existent Spirit--wilt thou weep?
    The end of birth is death; the end of death
    Is birth: this is ordained! and mournest thou,
    Chief of the stalwart arm! for what befalls
    Which could not otherwise befall?
    The birth Of living things comes unperceived;
    the death Comes unperceived;
    between them, beings perceive:
    What is there sorrowful herein, dear Prince?
  • Generals gathered in their masses
    just like witches at black masses.
    Evil minds that plot destruction,
    sorcerer of death's construction.
  • How shocking must thy summons be, O Death!
    To him that is at ease in his possessions!
    Who, counting on long years of pleasure here,
    Is quite unfurnished for the world to come!
    In that dread moment, how the frantic soul
    Raves round the walls of her clay tenement;
    Runs to each avenue, and shrieks for help;
    But shrieks in vain.
  • Sure 'tis a serious thing to die! My soul!
    What a strange moment must it be, when, near
    Thy journey's end, thou hast the gulf in view!
    That awful gulf, no mortal e'er repass'd
    To tell what's doing on the other side.
  • 'Tis long since Death had the majority.
  • Robert Blair, The Grave, line 451. Please "The Great Majority" found in Plautus. Trinium, II. 214
  • The theosophical view is really older than any religion, because it is natural to man. It was held as the truest thought by the Hindus and Egyptians and Greeks - to name but a few in ancient times - that death is simply a longer sleep than that we experience every night of our lives, after which the soul wakes again in a new body. All through the centuries this idea has been expressed by poets and philosophers. Theosophical writers have called this idea of rebirth "reincarnation," signifying that the soul, or real man, incarnates again in flesh when the suitable conditions for a further working out of its destiny are provided by a new body...in answer to the question, "Where are the dead?"... we might consider, there can be no such thing as someone "dead". The man who loses his body is, simply, according to this view, resting - and, perhaps, dreaming.
  • Men in great suffering are very apt to look first at the very worst of themselves and their lives, and afterward, toward the very best. And such - as the Hindus, Egyptians, and some of the Greeks taught - is the case after the death of the body. The soul, alone with its memories, struggles first to free itself from those most disturbing... The notions about heaven and hell, with which the people of "Christian" nations are more or less familiar, are probably the crude remains of earlier and more philosophical ideas. If we consider hell and heaven to be states of mind instead of places, it is easy to see the reason for such ideas. For each man, in the course of his normal living, enters periodically into states of great happiness and great unhappiness, and further more, while he is in them, he is apt to forget everything else. The mind, in other words, builds its own world. Is it so strange, then, to imagine that after the death of the body this same process may continue, in an even more intense degree, since no physical interruptions are possible?
  • If we consider hell and heaven to be states of mind instead of places, it is easy to see the reason for such ideas. For each man, in the course of his normal living, enters periodically into states of great happiness and great unhappiness, and further more, while he is in them, he is apt to forget everything else. The mind, in other words, builds its own world. Is it so strange, then, to imagine that after the death of the body this same process may continue, in an even more intense degree, since no physical interruptions are possible?
    Those who have "died" may logically be thought of as still existing, in one of these two states. Each state will last just as long as the nature of the person demands. Those who tired easily from psychological strain during life might require a long period of mental readjustment, while those who seemed to have the energy at all times to enter vigorously into even the most difficult experiences might be ready to be born again on earth in a much shorter time. The great philosopher Plato wrote an allegory in the last book of his Republic about souls making themselves ready to come back to earth again. Each one, he said, had a choice as to when and where to be born, but that choice must always be in accord with the soul's capacities and needs. So it is really a matter of being drawn naturally to the environment best suited to the soul, as provided by parents, family, and nation.
  • All our times have come
    Here but now they're gone
    Seasons don't fear the reaper
    Nor do the wind, the sun or the rain... we can be like they are
    Come on baby... don't fear the reaper
    Baby take my hand... don't fear the reaper
    We'll be able to fly... don't fear the reaper
    Baby I'm your man...
  • Physical death, so much a preoccupation in the death world, is less mortifying than what is peddled as life.
  • When I lived, I provided for every thing but death; now I must die, and am unprepared.
  • Cesare Borgia, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 176
  • Beyond the shining and the shading
    I shall be soon.
    Beyond the hoping and the dreading
    I shall be soon.
    Love, rest and home—
    Lord! tarry not, but come.
  • Horatius Bonar, Beyond the Smiling and the Weeping, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust, in sure and certain hope of the resurrection.
  • Book of Common Prayer, Burial of the Dead, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Man that is born of a woman hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.
  • Book of Common Prayer, Burial of the Dead; quoting from Job, XIV. 1, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • In the midst of life we are in death.
  • Book of Common Prayer, Burial of the Dead. Media vita in morte sumus. From a Latin antiphon. Found in the choirbook of the monks of St. Gall. Said to have been composed by Notker ("The Stammerer") in 911, while watching some workmen building a bridge at Martinsbrücke, in peril of their lives. Luther's antiphon "De Morte" Hymn XVIII is taken from this, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Everyone must leave something behind when he dies, my grandfather said. A child or a book or a painting or a house or a wall built or a pair of shoes made. Or a garden planted. Something your hand touched some way so your soul has somewhere to go when you die, and when people look at that tree or that flower you planted, you're there. It doesn't matter what you do, he said, so as long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that's like you after you take your hands away.
  • Here. Astride the top of nothingness, I suddenly receive the call of death. Who, in passing, tells me that it’s nothing. Nothing more than the absence of the word itself. Noting more, and simply nothingness.
  • 'Mid youth and song, feasting and carnival,
    Through laughter, through the roses, as of old
    Comes Death, on shadowy and relentless feet
    Death, unappeasable by prayer or gold;
    Death is the end, the end.
    Proud, then, clear-eyed and laughing, go to greet
    Death as a friend!
  • Rupert Brooke, Second Best, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Oh! death will find me, long before I tire
    Of watching you; and swing me suddenly
    Into the shade and loneliness and mire
    Of the last land!
  • Rupert Brooke, Sonnet (Collection 1908–1911), as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • A little before you made a leap in the dark.
  • Sir Thomas Browne, Works, II, 26 (1708 edition); Letters from the Dead (1701), Works, II, p. 502
  • The thousand doors that lead to death.
  • We all labour against our own cure; for death is the cure of all disease.
  • Pliny hath an odd and remarkable Passage concerning the Death of Men and Animals upon the Recess or Ebb of the Sea.
  • O Earth, so full of dreary noises!
    O men, with wailing in your voices!
    O delved gold, the waller's heap!
    O strife, O curse, that o'er it fall!
    God makes a silence through you all,
    And "giveth His beloved, sleep."
  • Elizabeth Browning, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 183
  • For I say, this is death and the sole death,
    When a man's loss comes to him from his gain,
    Darkness from light, from knowledge ignorance,
    And lack of love from love made manifest.
  • Robert Browning, A Death in the Desert, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Robert Browning, Bishop Blougram's Apology, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Fear Death? – to feel the fog in my throat,
    The mist in my face.
  • Sustained and soothed
    By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave
    Like one that wraps the drapery of his couch
    About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
  • All that tread
    The globe are but a handful to the tribes
    That slumber in its bosom.
  • “Well, Lord, is the soul the same as the body, is the soul one thing and the body another?”
“I have not declared that the soul is one thing and the body another.”
“Well, Lord, does the Tathagata exist after death?” …
“I have not declared that the Tathagata exists after death.” …
“But, Lord, why has the Lord not declared these things?”
“Potthapada, that is not conducive to the purpose, not conducive to Dhamma, not the way to embark on the holy life; it does not lead to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to calm, to higher knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbana. That is why I have not declared it.”
  • So he passed over and all the trumpets sounded
    For him on the other side.
  • John Bunyan, Pilgrim's Progress. Death of Valiant for Truth. Close of Part II
  • Dying visions of angels and Christ and God and heaven are confined to credibly good men. Why do not bad men have such visions? They die of all sorts of diseases; they have nervous temperaments; they even have creeds and hopes about the future which they cling to with very great tenacity; why do not they rejoice in some such glorious illusions when they go out of the world?
  • Enoch Fitch Burr, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 182
  • Die Todten reiten schnell.
    The dead ride swiftly.
  • Gottfried Bürger, Leonore, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • But, oh! fell Death's untimely frost,
    That nipt my flower sae early.
  • Robert Burns, Highland Mary, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • There is only rest and peace
    In the city of Surcease
    From the failings and the waitings 'neath the sun,
    And the wings of the swift years
    Beat but gently o'er the biers
    Making music to the sleepers every one.
  • Richard Eugene Burton, City of the Dead, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • They do neither plight nor wed
    In the city of the dead,
    In the city where they sleep away the hours.
  • Richard Eugene Burton, City of the Dead, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • We wonder if this can be really the close,
    Life's fever cooled by death's trance;
    And we cry, though it seems to our dearest of foes,
    "God give us another chance."
  • Richard Eugene Burton, Song of the Unsuccessful, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Timor mortis morte pejor.
    The fear of death is worse than death.
  • Friend Ralph! thou hast
    Outrun the constable at last!
  • Heaven gives its favourites — early death.
  • Without a grave, unknell'd, uncoffin'd, and unknown.
  • Ah! surely nothing dies but something mourns!
  • "Whom the gods love die young," was said of yore.
  • Death, so called, is a thing which makes men weep,
    And yet a third of life is pass'd in sleep.
  • Oh, God! it is a fearful thing
    To see the human soul take wing
    In any shape, in any mood!
  • Down to the dust! — and, as thou rott'st away,
    Even worms shall perish on thy poisonous clay.

C[edit]

  • Nothing, indeed, can be more deserving of our admiration than the conduct of the Christian martyrs, who cheerfully submitted to an ignominious death, inflicted by the most atrocious torments, rather than deny their faith even by the mere performance of an apparently insignificant rite of Paganism.
  • But this we may positively state, that nobody has made any progress in the school of Christ unless he cheerfully looks forward to the day of his death and to the day of the final resurrection.
  • John Calvin, Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life, pg. 78
  • To live in hearts we leave behind
    is not to die.
  • Brougham delivered a very warm panegyric upon the ex-Chancellor, and expressed a hope that he would make a good end, although to an expiring Chancellor death was now armed with a new terror.
  • And I still onward haste to my last night;
    Time's fatal wings do ever forward fly;
    So every day we live, a day we die.
  • Thomas Campion, Divine and Moral Songs, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Oh man, at that end not much has been left of your excellence, nothing of all that you have been boasting about through life - only sex, fear, self-admiration and a few other things you are usually ashamed of.
  • Karel Čapek, "Last Things of Man" (Stories from the Second Pocket, 1932)
  • His religion, at best, is an anxious wish; like that of Rabelais, "a great Perhaps."
  • Thomas Carlyle, Burns, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • I believe this thought, of the possibility of death — if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
    But, once realise what the true object is in life — that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of nobleminds' — but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfectMan — and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
  • Qui nunc it per iter tenebricosum
    Illuc unde negant redire quemquam.
    Who now travels that dark path from whose bourne they say no one returns.
  • Soles occidere et redire possunt;
    Nobis cum semel occidit brevis lux,
    Nox est perpetua una dormienda.
    Suns may set and rise; we, when our short day has closed, must sleep on during one neverending night.
  • When death hath poured oblivion through my veins,
    And brought me home, as all are brought, to lie
    In that vast house, common to serfs and thanes,—
    I shall not die, I shall not utterly die,
    For beauty born of beauty—that remains.
  • Madison Cawein, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • With regard to their actual course of studies, the main object of all education is, in their opinion, to imbue their scholars with a firm belief in the indestructibility of the human soul, which, according to their belief, merely passes at death from one tenement to another; for by such doctrine alone, they say, which robs death of all its terrors, can the highest form of human courage be developed.
  • If sudden, the visit of the Grim Reaper cannot be unwelcome.
  • Fausto Cercignani in: Brian Morris, Simply Transcribed. Quotations from Writings by Fausto Cercignani, 2014, quote 53
  • “Love the others and you will be loved!” is a saying that might sound as a terrible and unjust accusation against all the innocents that have been hated and perhaps even tortured and killed.
  • Fausto Cercignani in: Brian Morris, Simply Transcribed. Quotations from Writings by Fausto Cercignani, 2014, quote 58
  • "For all that let me tell thee, brother Panza," said Don Quixote, "that there is no recollection which time does not put an end to, and no pain which death does not remove."
    "And what greater misfortune can there be," replied Panza, "than the one that waits for time to put an end to it and death to remove it?"
  • It singeth low in every heart,
    We hear it each and all,—
    A song of those who answer not,
    However we may call;
    They throng (he silence of the breast,
    We see them as of yore,—
    The kind, the brave, the true, the sweet,
    Who walk with us no more.
  • John W. Chadwick, Auld Lang Syne, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • This character wherewith we sink into the grave at death is the very character wherewith we shall reappear at the resurrection.
  • Thomas Chalmers, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 180
  • When I hear it contended that the least sensitive are, on the whole, the most happy, I recall the Indian proverb: “It’s better to sit than to stand, it is better lie down than to sit, but death is best of all.”
    • Nicolas Chamfort, Maxims and Considerations, E. P. Mathers, trans. (1926), #155 (Parmée 131)
  • Back in 1980, less than 5 percent of Americans were cremated when they died. That figure now stands at about 50 percent... Rosehill charges just $180 to cremate a body, although the urn, flowers, and service are extra. A grave, by contrast, can cost $2,500, plus an additional $1,500 to open the ground with a backhoe.
  • Neither modern science nor ancient religion believes in complete free thought. Theology rebukes certain thoughts by calling them blasphemous. Science rebukes certain thoughts by calling them morbid. For example, some religious societies discouraged men more or less from thinking about sex. The new scientific society definitely discourages men from thinking about death; it is a fact, but it is considered a morbid fact.
  • Death is not the end. Death can never be the end. Death is the road. Life is the traveller. The soul is the guide.
  • At length, fatigued with life, he bravely fell,
    And health with Boerhaave bade the world farewell.
  • Ex vita discedo, tanquam ex hospitio, non tanquam ex domo.
    I depart from life as from an inn, and not as from my home.
  • Emori nolo: sed me esse mortuum nihil æstimo.
    Translation: I do not wish to die: but I care not if I were dead.
  • Cicero, Tusculanarum Disputationum, I. 8. translation of verse of Epicharmus
  • Vetat dominans ille in nobis deus, injussu hinc nos suo demigrare.
    The divinity who rules within us, forbids us to leave this world without his command.
  • Cicero, Tusculanarum Disputationum, I. 30
  • Undique enim ad inferos tantundem viæ est.
    There are countless roads on all sides to the grave.
  • Cicero, Tusculanarum Disputationum, I. 43
  • Supremus ille dies non nostri extinctionem sed commutationem affert loci.
    That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place.
  • Cicero, Tusculanarum Disputationum, I. 49
  • Some men make a womanish complaint that it is a great misfortune to die before our time. I would ask what time? Is it that of Nature? But she, indeed, has lent us life, as we do a sum of money, only no certain day is fixed for payment. What reason then to complain if she demands it at pleasure, since it was on this condition that you received it.
  • Cicero, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Death, to a good man is but passing through a dark entry, out of one little dusky room of his Father's house into another that is fair and large, lightsome and glorious, and divinely entertaining.
  • Adam Clarke, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 178
  • Omnia mors æquat.
    Death levels all things.
    • Variants:
    • Death knows no rank.
    • Mors sceptra ligonibus æquat.
      • Death equalizes the scepter and the spade
  • Inscribed over a 14th Century mural painting once at Battle Church, Sussex. Included in the 12th Century Vers sur la Mort. Ascribed to Thibaut de Marly. Also the motto of one of Symeoni's emblematic devices. See Notes and Queries (May 1917), p. 134
  • Our souls are prisoners of the terror of death, and the day is beautiful.
  • Paulo Coelho, in Quinta Montanha [The Fifth Mountain](1998), Ch. 1
  • Bloody pumps, face flat on the concrete. Here comes the white sheet. Mister Coroner, caught with some yellow tape, but the murderers escaped.
  • How well he fell asleep!
    Like some proud river, widening toward the sea;
    Calmly and grandly, silently and deep,
    Life joined eternity.
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 183
  • Mors dominos servis et sceptra ligonibus æquat,
    Dissimiles simili conditione trahens.
  • Death levels master and slave, the sceptre and the law, and makes the unlike like.
  • Walter Colman, La Danse Machabre or Death's Duell (c. 1633)
  • Death is like thunder in two particulars; we are alarmed at the sound of it; and it is formidable only from that which preceded it.
  • Charles Caleb Colton, as reported in, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) edited by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 180
  • Death comes with a crawl or he comes with a pounce,
    And whether he's slow, or spry,
    It isn't the fact that you're dead that counts,
    But only, how did you die?
  • Edmund Vance Cooke, How Did You Die?, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Qui ne craint point la mort ne craint point les menaces.
    He who does not fear death cares naught for threats.
  • Ut non ex vita, sed ex domo in domum videretur migrare.
    So that he seemed to depart not from life, but from one home to another.
  • Cornelius Nepos, Atticus, as reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • And all you men, whom greatness does so please,
Ye feast, I fear, like Damocles.
If you your eyes could upwards move,
(But you, I fear, think nothing is above)
You would perceive by what a little thread
The sword still hangs over your head.
No tide of wine would drown your cares,
No mirth or music over-noise your fears;
The fear of death would you so watchful keep,
As not to admit the image of it, sleep.
  • All flesh is grass, and all its glory fades
    Like the fair flower dishevell'd in the wind;
    Riches have wings, and grandeur is a dream;
    The man we celebrate must find a tomb,
    And we that worship him, ignoble graves.
  • All has its date below; the fatal hour
    Was register'd in Heav'n ere time began.
    We turn to dust, and all our mightiest works
    Die too.
  • William Cowper, The Task (1785), Book V, The Winter Morning Walk, line 540
  • Two hands upon the breast,
    And labor's done;
    Two pale feet cross'd in rest,
    The race is won.
  • Life, that dares send
    A challenge to his end,
    And when it comes, say, "Welcome, friend!"
If we kept in mind that we will soon inevitably die, our lives would be completely different. If a person knows that he will die in a half hour, he certainly will not bother doing trivial, stupid, or, especially, bad things during this half hour. Perhaps you have half a century before you die — what makes this any different from a half hour? ~ Leo Tolstoy
The bitter, yet merciful, lesson which death teaches us is to distinguish the gold from the tinsel, the true values from the worthless chaff. ~ Felix Adler
Every breath you take is a step towards death. ~ Ali
Death is a friend of ours; and he that is not ready to entertain him is not at home. ~ Francis Bacon
Men fear death, as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other. ~ Francis Bacon
The fittest place where man can die
Is where he dies for man. ~ Michael J. Barry
For the average good citizen, death is a continuance of the living process in his consciousness and a carrying forward of the interests and tendencies of the life... For the wicked and cruelly selfish... there eventuates that condition which we call "earth-bound"... ~Alice Bailey
Much good will be brought about through the growing custom to cremate those forms which the indwelling life has vacated; when it is an universal custom, we shall see a definite minimising of disease, leading to longevity and increased vitality... It is wise, however, to wait twelve hours in order to ensure true death. ~ Alice Bailey
Death is only a change that gives the soul a partial liberation, releasing him from the heaviest of his chains... Death is the greatest of earth's illusions; there is no death, but only changes in life-conditions... ~Annie Besant
The theosophical view is really older than any religion, because it is natural to man. It was held as the truest thought by the Hindus and Egyptians and Greeks - to name but a few in ancient times - that death is simply a longer sleep than that we experience every night of our lives, after which the soul wakes again in a new body... ~H.P. Blavatsky
If we consider hell and heaven to be states of mind instead of places, it is easy to see the reason for such ideas. For each man, in the course of his normal living, enters periodically into states of great happiness and great unhappiness, and further more, while he is in them, he is apt to forget everything else...~ H.P. Blavatsky
Death, so called, is a thing which makes men weep,
And yet a third of life is pass'd in sleep. ~ Lord Byron
The main avenue, Rawdon Crematorium
Once realise what the true object is in life — [..] that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfectMan — and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning! ~ Lewis Carroll
The principal point of their [Druids] doctrine is that the soul does not die and that after death it passes from one body into another... with a firm belief in the indestructibility of the human soul, which, according to their belief, merely passes at death from one tenement to another; for by such doctrine alone, they say, which robs death of all its terrors, can the highest form of human courage be developed. ~Julius Caesar
Back in 1980, less than 5 percent of Americans were cremated when they died. That figure now stands at about 50 percent... Rosehill charges just $180 to cremate a body, although the urn, flowers, and service are extra. A grave, by contrast, can cost $2,500, plus an additional $1,500 to open the ground with a backhoe. ~ Caren Chesler, Popular Mechanics (1 March 2018)]
The divinity who rules within us, forbids us to leave this world without his command... That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place...I depart from life as from an inn, and not as from my home. ~Cicero
Death is not the end. Death can never be the end. Death is the road. Life is the traveller. The soul is the guide. ~ Sri Chinmoy
That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place. ~Cicero
One of the great tragedies of our present outlook on existence is our attitude to that recurring event which we call death. We approach it, for the most part, with fear and loathing, seeking by every means to resist its call, prolonging, often beyond its usefulness, the activity of the physical body as a guarantee of "life"....Despite the vast amount of evidence gathered over the years... that life of some kind continues after death; despite the intellectual acceptance by many that death is but an awakening into new and freer life; in spite of the growing belief in reincarnation; notwithstanding the testimony of the wisest Teachers down the ages... ~Benjamin Creme

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i wish i would die quotes

For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives.

People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I learnt never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.

When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again. Here are the most common five:

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

This was the most common regret of all. When people realise that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made.

It is very important to try and honour at least some of your dreams along the way. From the moment that you lose your health, it is too late. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it.

2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Women also spoke of this regret. But as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.

By simplifying your lifestyle and making conscious choices along the way, it is possible to not need the income that you think you do. And by creating more space in your life, you become happier and more open to new opportunities, ones more suited to your new lifestyle.

3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.

Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.

We cannot control the reactions of others. However, although people may initially react when you change the way you are by speaking honestly, in the end it raises the relationship to a whole new and healthier level. Either that or it releases the unhealthy relationship from your life. Either way, you win.

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.

It is common for anyone in a busy lifestyle to let friendships slip. But when you are faced with your approaching death, the physical details of life fall away. People do want to get their financial affairs in order if possible. But it is not money or status that holds the true importance for them. They want to get things in order more for the benefit of those they love. Usually though, they are too ill and weary to ever manage this task. It all comes down to love and relationships in the end. That is all that remains in the final weeks, love and relationships.

5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realise until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called ‘comfort’ of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to their selves, that they were content. When deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again.

When you are on your deathbed, what others think of you is a long way from your mind. How wonderful to be able to let go and smile again, long before you are dying.

Life is a choice. It is YOUR life. Choose consciously, choose wisely, choose honestly. Choose happiness.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Based around this article, Bronnie has released a full length book titled The Top Five Regrets of the Dying – A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing. It is a memoir of her own life and how it was transformed through the regrets of the dying people she cared for. This inspiring memoir has been read by more than a million people worldwide, with translations in 32 languages.  More information about regret-free living is available here.

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“Before you can live a part of you has to die. You have to let go of what could have been, how you should have acted and what you wish you would have said .

i wish i would die quotes
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