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Jan 2, 2019 We have classic get well wishes, wishes for friends and family and get well quotes May good health and happiness be closer than you think.

When you’re writing a get well card it’s important to select your words wisely. Your well wishes have the power to aid in someone’s recovery and bring a smile to their face. By shining light on the positives and looking to the future you will make someone feel better with your kind words, but it’s not always easy to know exactly what to say. Before you fill the blank space of your greeting card, you’ll need to consider three things: the person you are writing to, your relationship with them, and the condition they are in. Whether you’re looking for inspirational quotes, get well wishes after surgery, or funny get well wishes to lift spirits, we have you covered with everything you need to know about what to write in a get well card below.

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What To Write In A Get Well Card

Writing thoughtful get well wishes and adding inspiring get well soon quotes to your greeting card is the best way to show someone you are thinking of them during a tough time. Remember that personalization is key and a heartfelt get well soon message can do so much more than any other gift.

1. Use A Warm Greeting To Start Your Get Well Sentiment

Take into consideration who you are writing to as well as circumstance. Both of these details are important and will set the tone for your message. “Dear” is a safe standby, but you can choose to go with a warmer greeting if you are writing to friends, family or others you may have close relationships with.

2. Write A Few Get Well Wishes

Start your card off with well wishes that are specific to what the recipient is going through. Adding statements that instill hope and optimism will be a fundamental part of helping someone heal. Don’t dwell on the negatives, make sure that your wishes stay positive, upbeat and have the power to inspire.

3. Express Your Love In Get Well Messages

If you are close to the card recipient, write a get well saying that expresses your love and gratefulness. Add an anecdote or inside joke that the two of you share to ensure you will bring a smile to their face. It’s also easier to write a funny get well wish and add humor to the greeting card if you and the recipient are close.

4. If Religious, Send Prayers in Get Well Messages

If you share a religious bond with the card recipient, let them know that they are in your prayers. It can be encouraging for someone going through something serious to know that they are in your prayers. Shining light on the faith you share is another way to show your compassion.

5. Use Get Well Quotes

Use quotes to offer encouragement. Change someone’s habits, mind and emotions with an inspirational quote they can identify with during a difficult time. Don’t be afraid to borrow a few words from an award winning author or inspirational figure. Quotes are the perfect way to offer encouragement.

6. Remind Them You’re Thinking of Them

Tell them you’re thinking about them. Letting someone know that they are in your thoughts provides a sense of love and support for someone who is going through a hard time. Comforting words can make all the difference to your get well card message.

7. Be Empathetic

Try to understand this person’s feelings or emotions and make sure that your message and tone reflect that. Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes will help you find the right words to say. Avoid overthinking this part of your message and don’t let the fear of saying the wrong thing cause you to say nothing at all. However, do your best to avoid minimizing what the person is going through just because you may be able to relate.

8. Offer Your Support

When someone gets ill or becomes injured, even day to day activities become difficult to do. If you have the time and opportunity to help out in any way, offer to do so in your get well soon card. Some ideas include helping out with meals, cleaning up around the house, offering childcare or anything else that you see fit for the situation. In most situations, people won’t ask for help so you offering to do so is a great way to show that you care. Be specific when you are offering to help out and make sure that you follow through with what you’ve offered.

9. Sign Off With A Warm Closing

You’ll want to close your get well card with a warm closing. For example: “thinking of you”, “take care” and “wishing you healing” are all perfect ways to wrap up your card.

Get Well Wishes

Common get well wishes include mentioning hopes for feeling better, speedy recovery messages, and words that let the card recipient know that you are thinking of them. Short and sweet get well wishes are the perfect thing to write in a get well soon card for any recipient. Use one of the wishes below or try combining a few to create a longer and more meaningful message.

Examples for Get Well Wishes:

  • Feel better soon!
  • Hope you feel better soon.
  • Hoping you find strength with each new day. You are in our thoughts.
  • Have a speedy recovery!
  • I hope each new day brings you closer to a full and speedy recovery!
  • May good health envelop you, spurring a quick recovery.
  • Thinking of you lots and hoping for your speedy recovery.
  • We’re all thinking about you and wishing you a speedy recovery.
  • Hang in there, better days are coming.
  • Hope you feel a little better every day.
  • Sending good, healthy vibes your way.
  • Sending hugs and love!
  • Remember to just take it one day at a time and in no time, you will be completely healthy and smiling once again.
  • You’re in all of our warmest thoughts as you recover from your accident.
  • Best wishes for a little progress and a little encouragement everyday during your recuperation.
  • Best wishes that you will soon be back to doing all the things you love.
  • May the good wishes and warm thoughts of those who care about you send a little cheerfulness into your world and help you feel better.

Religious Get Well Wishes And Verses

Adding religious get well wishes or verses to your get well note is a great way to share your faith and encourage someone in their spirits during difficult times. These well wishes serve as a shining light that can often provide a sense of personal comfort when someone is struggling. Try out one of the religious sentiments below and let your card provide a source of strength to those who could use a few words of encouragement.

Examples of Religious Get Well Wishes:

  • Praying for you!
  • You are in my thoughts and prayers during your time of recovery.
  • As I close my eyes to pray every night, my only request is that God will heal you speedily. I wish you a quick recovery!
  • Thoughtful prayers are being sent your way with the hopes that you will feel better soon.
  • Thinking of you during this time of illness, and praying you will find strength in the Lord and his never ending supply of love.
  • God cares and hears our prayers, and I am praying for you today!
  • Know God promises to give strength when you need it and that we are praying for you to have strength and peace as you face health challenges.

​Send well wishes to a patient in the hospital. Our dedicated volunteers are pleased to personally deliver a well-wishing email to a patient in many of our.

Campbell's® Healthy Wishes Bouquet by Teleflora

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Overview

It doesn’t matter if you’re 18 or 85, taking charge of your own health care decisions and planning ahead can not only ensure you can think about your choices and get the care that you want, but will reduce uncertainty and anxiety for those who care about you.

Since 2005, Sharing Your Wishes™ community coalitions have helped spread this message across western and central New York. Sharing Your Wishes is a program designed to make older adults aware of the importance of planning in advance for their health care in the event that they are unable to make or communicate their decisions.

In each community, a coalition of people is committed to improving care for older adults and, through outreach and education, distributing materials and working to create change within health care institutions, has made sure that talking about health care decisions before a crisis is now a conversation many individuals are having with loved ones.

Results

Though Health Foundation funding has ended, Sharing Your Wishes programs are still operating in 13 counties throughout Western and Central New York.

Sharing Your Wishes Program Summary Report

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What to write in a get well soon after surgery card

wishes for health

Is your friend ill at home or in a hospital? Send your get well soon wishes and let him or her know that you wish them a speedy recovery.

Opt for get well soon flowers to be sent home, because some hospital may refuse deliveries of fresh flowers – or send a get well soon gift instead that can be delivered to the hospital.

Get Well Soon Wishes for a Friend

  1. I heard you were feeling unwell. Here is to wishing you a speedy recovery.
  2. I was saddened when I heard you were ill; here I brought you a bouquet of gorgeous flowery red rose as a sign of my love and high hope for your health and happiness. Get well soon.
  3. Like a flower in bloom, you lie helpless. Arise and bloom and dance like a fresh blade of grass to the drumming of the breeze of life. Arise and bounce back home like a ball. I wish you a quick recovery.
  4. We are so eager to have you back with us. Arise and shine and bounce back to life. We wish you a quick return to health.
  5. Say goodbye to that bout of bad health, and get well soon.
  6. Get well soon! Everyone here misses your contagious smile. Nothing has been the same since you became ill. No one tells a joke like you do, so please hurry and get well fast!
  7. The little flowers are rising and blooming; it’s the world’s way of saying, “get well soon.”
  8. May you enjoy this time off to put your feet up and recover fully. We hope that the next few weeks are filled with lots of rest.
  9. It has not been easy for me since I heard you were not feeling fine. I send you this message to let you know I’m thinking of you and hope you will get better soon; wishing you fast return to health.
  10. I look forward to your full recovery so we can get together again soon.
  11. Get well soon! Your family and friends miss you a lot and look forward to your return. We all send our best prayers to you, and want you to know that you are greatly missed! So, take good care and return to us soon.
  12. My heart skipped its beat when I received the news of your ill-health. I wish you could tap health from me and remain healthy that I may see your smiles every day at the office. I pour my well-wishes like a libation and offer my prayers as a sacrifice for your health renewal.
  13. Don’t worry: you will be back on your feet in no time, and then you will be wishing you were on your feet again, resting!
  14. Fair warning, laughter may be the best remedy when you are feeling under the weather.
  15. It has not been easy for me since I heard you were not feeling fine. I send you this message to let you know I’m thinking of you and hope you will get better soon; wishing you fast return to health.

Selection of Get Well Soon Flowers

There is nothing that can help to restore someone back to health than fresh blooming flowers. Flowers brighten up the room and some studies even concluded they are good for our mental health. You don’t need any more reasons not to brighten up someone’s home or hospital room with get well soon flowers.

Please check with the hospital before sending any get well soon flowers as many will refuse delivery of fresh flower due to hygienic reasons.

Order your get well soon flowers from SerenataFlowers.com and you will get a free greeting card where you can include one of the messages above. Here is just a small selection of getting well soon flowers starting from only £19.99 with free delivery all week, including weekends. Place your order by 10pm the night before for next day flower delivery in the UK.

Sources: my-best-wishes.com, wishesgreeting.com and wishesquotes.com

Lily Calyx

Lily Calyx is our in-house flower whisperer, an expert on all things botanical and an enthusiastic orchids collector. She loves discussing the insights of the secret world of flowers, shares her gardening tips and hacks and moons over the latest additions to Serenata Flowers flower range. Ask Lily anything about flowers and we can guarantee she will have the answer.

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Sep 19, 2019 Sending you good wishes for your quick recovery and good health. Get well soon ! Get Well Soon Messages. A Get- well Blessing Like a flower.

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Advance Care Planning: Healthcare Directives

Advance care planning is not just about old age. At any age, a medical crisis could leave you too ill to make your own healthcare decisions. Even if you are not sick now, planning for health care in the future is an important step toward making sure you get the medical care you would want, if you are unable to speak for yourself and doctors and family members are making the decisions for you.

Many Americans face questions about medical treatment but may not be capable of making those decisions, for example, in an emergency or at the end of life. This article will explain the types of decisions that may need to be made in such cases and questions you can think about now so you're prepared later. It can help you think about who you would want to make decisions for you if you can't make them yourself. It will also discuss ways you can share your wishes with others. Knowing who you want to make decisions on your behalf and how you would decide might take some of the burden off family and friends.

What Is Advance Care Planning?

Advance care planning involves learning about the types of decisions that might need to be made, considering those decisions ahead of time, and then letting others know—both your family and your healthcare providers—about your preferences. These preferences are often put into an advance directive, a legal document that goes into effect only if you are incapacitated and unable to speak for yourself. This could be the result of disease or severe injury—no matter how old you are. It helps others know what type of medical care you want.

An advance directive also allows you to express your values and desires related to end-of-life care. You might think of it as a living document—one that you can adjust as your situation changes because of new information or a change in your health.

Medical Research and Advance Care Planning

Research shows that advance directives can make a difference, and that people who document their preferences in this way are more likely to get the care they prefer at the end of life than people who do not.

Advance Care Planning Decisions

Sometimes decisions must be made about the use of emergency treatments to keep you alive. Doctors can use several artificial or mechanical ways to try to do this. Decisions that might come up at this time relate to:

  • CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)
  • Ventilator use
  • Artificial nutrition (tube feeding) and artificial hydration (IV, or intravenous, fluids)
  • Comfort care

What is CPR? Cardiopulmonary resuscitation might restore your heartbeat if your heart stops or is in a life-threatening abnormal rhythm. It involves repeatedly pushing on the chest with force, while putting air into the lungs. This force has to be quite strong, and sometimes ribs are broken or a lung collapses. Electric shocks, known as defibrillation, and medicines might also be used as part of the process. The heart of a young, otherwise healthy person might resume beating normally after CPR. Often, CPR does not succeed in older adults who have multiple chronic illnesses or who are already frail.

Using a ventilator as emergency treatment. Ventilators are machines that help you breathe. A tube connected to the ventilator is put through the throat into the trachea (windpipe) so the machine can force air into the lungs. Putting the tube down the throat is called intubation. Because the tube is uncomfortable, medicines are often used to keep you sedated while on a ventilator. If you are expected to remain on a ventilator for a long time, a doctor may perform a tracheotomy or "trach" (rhymes with "make"). During this bedside surgery, the tube is inserted directly into the trachea through a hole in the neck. For long-term help with breathing, a trach is more comfortable, and sedation is not needed. People using such a breathing tube are not able to speak without special help because exhaled air does not go past their vocal cords.

Using artificial nutrition and hydration near the end of life. If you are not able to eat, you may be fed through a feeding tube that is threaded through the nose down to your stomach. If tube feeding is still needed for an extended period, a feeding tube may be surgically inserted directly into your stomach. Hand feeding (sometimes called assisted oral feeding) is an alternative to tube feeding. This approach may have fewer risks, especially for people with dementia.

If you are not able to drink, you may be provided with IV fluids. These are delivered through a thin plastic tube inserted into a vein.

Artificial nutrition and hydration can be helpful if you are recovering from an illness. However, studies have shown that artificial nutrition toward the end of life does not meaningfully prolong life. Artificial nutrition and hydration may also be harmful if the dying body cannot use the nutrition properly.

What is comfort care at the end of life? Comfort care is anything that can be done to soothe you and relieve suffering while staying in line with your wishes. Comfort care includes managing shortness of breath; limiting medical testing; providing spiritual and emotional counseling; and giving medication for pain, anxiety, nausea, or constipation.

Learn more about hospice care and other healthcare decisions you may need to make at the end of life.

Getting Started with Advance Care Planning

Start by thinking about what kind of treatment you do or do not want in a medical emergency. It might help to talk with your doctor about how your current health conditions might influence your health in the future. For example, what decisions would you or your family face if your high blood pressure leads to a stroke? You can ask your doctor to help you understand and think through your choices before you put them in writing. Discussing advance care planning decisions with your doctor is free through Medicare during your annual wellness visit. Private health insurance may also cover these discussions.

If you don't have any medical issues now, your family medical history might be a clue to help you think about the future. Talk with your doctor about decisions that might come up if you develop health problems similar to those of other family members.

In considering treatment decisions, your personal values are key. Is your main desire to have the most days of life? Or, would your focus be on quality of life, as you see it? What if an illness leaves you paralyzed or in a permanent coma and you need to be on a ventilator? Would you want that?

What makes life meaningful to you? If your heart stops or you have trouble breathing, would you want to undergo life-saving measures if it meant that, in the future, you could be well enough to spend time with your family? Would you be content if the emergency leaves you simply able to spend your days listening to books on tape or gazing out the window?

But, there are many other scenarios. Here are a few. What would you decide?

  • If a stroke leaves you unable to move and then your heart stops, would you want CPR? What if you were also mentally impaired by a stroke—does your decision change?
  • What if you are in pain at the end of life? Do you want medication to treat the pain, even if it will make you more drowsy and lethargic?
  • What if you are permanently unconscious and then develop pneumonia? Would you want antibiotics and to be placed on a ventilator?

For some people, staying alive as long as medically possible, or long enough to see an important event like a grandchild's wedding, is the most important thing. An advance directive can help to make that possible. Others have a clear idea about when they would no longer want to prolong their life. An advance directive can help with that, too.

Your decisions about how to handle any of these situations could be different at age 40 than at age 85. Or, they could be different if you have an incurable condition as opposed to being generally healthy. An advance directive allows you to provide instructions for these types of situations and then to change the instructions as you get older or if your viewpoint changes.

Do You or a Family Member Have Alzheimer's Disease?

Many people are unprepared to deal with the legal and financial consequences of a serious illness such as Alzheimer's disease. Advance planning can help people with Alzheimer's and their families clarify their wishes and make well-informed decisions about health care and financial arrangements.

Learn more about legal and financial planning for people with Alzheimer's disease.

Making Your Advance Care Wishes Known

There are two main elements in an advance directive—a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care. There are also other documents that can supplement your advance directive. You can choose which documents to create, depending on how you want decisions to be made. These documents include:

  • Living will
  • Durable power of attorney for health care
  • Other advance care planning documents

Living will. A living will is a written document that helps you tell doctors how you want to be treated if you are dying or permanently unconscious and cannot make your own decisions about emergency treatment. In a living will, you can say which of the procedures described in the Decisions That Could Come Up section you would want, which ones you wouldn't want, and under which conditions each of your choices applies.

Durable power of attorney for health care. A durable power of attorney for health care is a legal document naming a healthcare proxy, someone to make medical decisions for you at times when you are unable to do so. Your proxy, also known as a representative, surrogate, or agent, should be familiar with your values and wishes. This means that he or she will be able to decide as you would when treatment decisions need to be made. A proxy can be chosen in addition to or instead of a living will. Having a healthcare proxy helps you plan for situations that cannot be foreseen, like a serious auto accident.

Some people are reluctant to put specific health decisions in writing. For them, naming a healthcare agent might be a good approach, especially if there is someone they feel comfortable talking with about their values and preferences. A named proxy can evaluate each situation or treatment option independently.

Other advance care planning documents. You might also want to prepare documents to express your wishes about a single medical issue or something not already covered in your advance directive. A living will usually covers only the specific life-sustaining treatments discussed earlier. You might want to give your healthcare proxy specific instructions about other issues, such as blood transfusion or kidney dialysis. This is especially important if your doctor suggests that, given your health condition, such treatments might be needed in the future.

Medical issues that might arise at the end of life include:

  • DNR orders
  • Organ and tissue donation
  • POLST and MOLST forms

A DNR (do not resuscitate) order tells medical staff in a hospital or nursing facility that you do not want them to try to return your heart to a normal rhythm if it stops or is beating unsustainably using CPR or other life-support measures. Sometimes this document is referred to as a DNAR (do not attempt resuscitation) or an AND (allow natural death) order. Even though a living will might say CPR is not wanted, it is helpful to have a DNR order as part of your medical file if you go to a hospital. Posting a DNR next to your bed might avoid confusion in an emergency situation. Without a DNR order, medical staff will make every effort to restore your breathing and the normal rhythm of your heart.

A similar document, called a DNI (do not intubate) order, tells medical staff in a hospital or nursing facility that you do not want to be put on a breathing machine.

A non-hospital DNR order will alert emergency medical personnel to your wishes regarding measures to restore your heartbeat or breathing if you are not in the hospital.

Organ and tissue donation allow organs or body parts from a generally healthy person who has died to be transplanted into people who need them. Commonly, the heart, lungs, pancreas, kidneys, corneas, liver, and skin are donated. There is no age limit for organ and tissue donation. You can carry a donation card in your wallet. Some states allow you to add this decision to your driver's license. Some people also include organ donation in their advance care planning documents.

At the time of death, family members may be asked about organ donation. If those close to you, especially your proxy, know how you feel about organ donation, they will be ready to respond. There is no cost to the donor's family for this gift of life. If the person has requested a DNR order but wants to donate organs, he or she might have to indicate that the desire to donate supersedes the DNR. That is because it might be necessary to use machines to keep the heart beating until the medical staff is ready to remove the donated organs.

Learn more about organ and tissue donation.

POLST and MOLST forms provide guidance about your medical care preferences in the form of a doctor's orders. Typically you create a POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment) or MOLST (Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment) when you are near the end of life or critically ill and know the specific decisions that might need to be made on your behalf. These forms serve as a medical order in addition to your advance directive. They make it possible for you to provide guidance that healthcare professionals can act on immediately in an emergency.

A number of states use POLST and MOLST forms, which are filled out by your doctor or sometimes by a nurse practitioner or physician's assistant. The doctor fills out a POLST or MOLST after discussing your wishes with you and your family. Once signed by your doctor, this form has the same authority as any other medical order. Check with your state department of health to find out if these forms are available where you live.

Advance Care Planning: Pacemakers and ICDs

Some people have pacemakers to help their hearts beat regularly. If you have one and are near death, it may not necessarily keep you alive. But, you might have an ICD (implantable cardioverter-defibrillator) placed under your skin to shock your heart back into regular beatings if the rhythm becomes irregular. If you decline other life-sustaining measures, the ICD may be turned off. You need to state in your advance directive what you want done if the doctor suggests it is time to turn it off.

How to Choose Your Healthcare Proxy

If you decide to choose a proxy, think about people you know who share your views and values about life and medical decisions. Your proxy might be a family member, a friend, your lawyer, or someone in your social or spiritual community. It's a good idea to also name an alternate proxy. It is especially important to have a detailed living will if you choose not to name a proxy.

You can decide how much authority your proxy has over your medical care—whether he or she is entitled to make a wide range of decisions or only a few specific ones. Try not to include guidelines that make it impossible for the proxy to fulfill his or her duties. For example, it's probably not unusual for someone to say in conversation, "I don't want to go to a nursing home," but think carefully about whether you want a restriction like that in your advance directive. Sometimes, for financial or medical reasons, that may be the best choice for you.

Of course, check with those you choose as your healthcare proxy and alternate before you name them officially. Make sure they are comfortable with this responsibility.

Making Your Healthcare Directives Official

Once you have talked with your doctor and have an idea of the types of decisions that could come up in the future and whom you would like as a proxy, if you want one at all, the next step is to fill out the legal forms detailing your wishes. A lawyer can help but is not required. If you decide to use a lawyer, don't depend on him or her to help you understand different medical treatments. Start the planning process by talking with your doctor.

Many states have their own advance directive forms. Your local Area Agency on Aging can help you locate the right forms. You can find your area agency phone number by calling the Eldercare Locator toll-free at 1-800-677-1116 or by visiting https://eldercare.acl.gov.

Some states require your advance directive to be witnessed; a few require your signature to be notarized. A notary is a person licensed by the state to witness signatures. You might find a notary at your bank, post office, or local library, or call your insurance agent. Some notaries charge a fee.

Some states have registries that can store your advance directive for quick access by healthcare providers, your proxy, and anyone else to whom you have given permission. Private firms also will store your advance directive. There may be a fee for storing your form in a registry. If you store your advance directive in a registry and later make changes, you must replace the original with the updated version in the registry.

Some people spend a lot of time in more than one state—for example, visiting children and grandchildren. If that's your situation, consider preparing an advance directive using forms for each state—and keep a copy in each place, too.

What to Do After You Set Up Your Advance Directive

Give copies of your advance directive to your healthcare proxy and alternate proxy. Give your doctor a copy for your medical records. Tell close family members and friends where you keep a copy. If you have to go to the hospital, give staff there a copy to include in your records. Because you might change your advance directive in the future, it's a good idea to keep track of who receives a copy.

Review your advance care planning decisions from time to time—for example, every 10 years, if not more often. You might want to revise your preferences for care if your situation or your health changes. Or, you might want to make adjustments if you receive a serious diagnosis; if you get married, separated, or divorced; if your spouse dies; or if something happens to your proxy or alternate. If your preferences change, you will want to make sure your doctor, proxy, and family know about them.

Talking About Your Advance Care Wishes

It can be helpful to have conversations with the people close to you about how you want to be cared for in a medical emergency or at the end of life. These talks can help you think through the wishes you want to put in your advance directive.

It's especially helpful to talk about your thoughts, beliefs, and values with your healthcare proxy. This will help prepare him or her to make medical decisions that best reflect your values.

After you have completed your advance directive, talk about your decisions with your healthcare proxy, loved ones, and your doctor to explain what you have decided. This way, they are not surprised by your wishes if there is an emergency.

Another way to convey your wishes is to make a video of yourself talking about them. This lets you express your wishes in your own words. Videos do not replace an advance directive, but they can be helpful for your healthcare proxy and your loved ones.

Be Prepared

What happens if you have no advance directive or have made no plans and you become unable to speak for yourself? In such cases, the state where you live will assign someone to make medical decisions on your behalf. This will probably be your spouse, your parents if they are available, or your children if they are adults. If you have no family members, the state will choose someone to represent your best interests.

Always remember: an advance directive is only used if you are in danger of dying and need certain emergency or special measures to keep you alive, but you are not able to make those decisions on your own. An advance directive allows you to make your wishes about medical treatment known.

It is difficult to predict the future with certainty. You may never face a medical situation where you are unable to speak for yourself and make your wishes known. But having an advance directive may give you and those close to you some peace of mind.

Advance Directive Wallet Card

You might want to make a card to carry in your wallet indicating that you have an advance directive and where it is kept. Here is an example of the wallet card offered by the American Hospital Association. You might want to print this to fill out and carry with you. A PDF can be found online (PDF, 40 KB).

Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español.

For More Information About Healthcare Directives

Content reviewed: January 15, 2018

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understand your wishes and are familiar with your advance directive documents. We recommend appointing a health care agent and making your wishes.

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