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Wish have a nice day
September 24, 2019 Anniversary Wishes For Parents 4 comments

A card with sunshine, hugs and flowers to wish a great day. Free online Wish You A Nice Day.

Hello.
I think I know the meaning of "have a nice day."

Yet, I don't know the sentence structure.

Is this command, grammatically?
OR
It is an abbreviation sentence of;
"I wish you have a nice day"
or
"I wish you will have a nice day"?
I can't explain why it's correct but know it is!

I guess when you say "have a nice day", you are hoping/wishing that the person does.
I wish you have a nice day-incorrect
I wish you will have a nice day - incorrect

I would say: I hope you have a nice day. But people simply say "Have a nice/good day" Hope it helps a bit
I can't explain why it's correct but know it is!

I guess when you say "have a nice day", you are hoping/wishing that the person does.
I wish you have a nice day-incorrect
I wish you will have a nice day - incorrect

I would say: I hope you have a nice day. But people simply say "Have a nice/good day" Hope it helps a bit
Thank you for your comment.

I would like to know why you think "I wish you have a nice day-incorrect" and you would say "I hope you have a nice day."
Is there difference between hope and wish?

And about "command sentence", I would like to know whether "Please have a nice day" will work or not.

Thanks in advance.
I would like to know why you think "I wish you have a nice day-incorrect"
The first and foremost reason is that native English speakers would never say it this way.

Secondly, "wish" and "hope" are not exact synonyms and each has nuances and "wish" can in some contexts contain an element of doubt and/oir hopelessness.
Hi.
In Japanese forum, I sometimes read this kind of question, which is about the sentence's grammatical structure of Japanese daily greeting idioms.
It is asked by non-native Japanese speaker, and I sometimes think it is rediculous.
BUT I found myself doing the same thing now.
When we learn another language, we tend to try analysing all sentence structure. I think it is some kind of curiosity.
The sentence "have a nice day" is imperative: that is, it is a command. Even if one adds "please", it is still imperative.
Thank you, GreenWhiteBlue.
I got it.
I wonder if it is imperative or not, so your answer is exactly what I'm looking for.
Thanks.

The first and foremost reason is that native English speakers would never say it this way.

Secondly, "wish" and "hope" are not exact synonyms and each has nuances and "wish" can in some contexts contain an element of doubt and/oir hopelessness.
Thank you, sdgraham.
I understand.
I've learned from you the difference of the two words.

So I should have named myself as "hopefull" rather than "wishfull".

Thank you, all.
Have a nice day.

natkretep

Moderato con anima (English Only)
English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
Initially, I thought that these would all involve the use of the imperative:

  • Have a nice day.
  • Have a good trip.
  • Have a pleasant evening.

Now I wonder whether it might not be more convincing to think of them as involving the subjunctive. Compare this with the attested subjunctive in 'God bless you' (meaning: May God bless you). 'Have a nice day' means 'May you have a nice day'.

Additionally, 'Please have a nice day' sounds very strange to me, whereas 'You have a nice day' is possible, I think.
Initially, I thought that these would all involve the use of the imperative:

  • Have a nice day.
  • Have a good trip.
  • Have a pleasant evening.
Now I wonder whether it might not be more convincing to think of them as involving the subjunctive. Compare this with the attested subjunctive in 'God bless you' (meaning: May God bless you). 'Have a nice day' means 'May you have a nice day'.

Additionally, 'Please have a nice day' sounds very strange to me, whereas 'You have a nice day' is possible, I think.
Hi.
Thank you for your comment.

I think there are two interpretations in this kind of sentences; Subjunctive or Imperative.
My method to distinguish them was to add "please".
If it is still make sense after adding "please", the sentence must be imperative.
If not, it must be subjunctive.

According to your comment, you judged that "Have a nice day" is imperative for the first time, but "Please have a nice day" doesn't make sense. You thought it might be subjunctive.

So I want to know which is your conclusion.
And I would like to know that my method to distingish them is correct or not.
Last edited:

natkretep

Moderato con anima (English Only)
English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
On balance, I prefer the subjunctive interpretation. And yes, 'please' does not work with the subjunctive.
The sentence "have a nice day" is imperative: that is, it is a command. Even if one adds "please", it is still imperative.
I agree. It is a command.

I always say, "Have a day". It seems presumptuous to command someone to have a particular type of day. They may have other ideas on the subject.

"I wish you a Merry Christmas", has another structure. It means that you have made a wish on behalf of the subject. It is not a command.

Have a nice day is a commonly spoken expression used to conclude a conversation (whether .. or "Tschüss!" (both meaning "goodbye")—which German shopkeepers frequently use—to "dubious wishes for a nice day" he opined that that is.

Kitty Wants You To Have A Nice Day!

wish have a nice day

Learn how to use the verbs wish and hope to give good wishes and say nice things to someone in English.
We use the verbs wish and hope differently. Wish is more formal so when someone is wishing someone something it’s more likely to be written English. When we’re talking about future possibilities we generally use ‘hope’. It’s the verb we commonly use to give good wishes.
In this video you’ll see lots of examples and learn some other common ways to wish people nice things, like ‘Have a nice day‘ and ‘Have a great weekend‘.


Click here to learn how to use the verbs wait, hope, expect and look forward to
Click hereto learn more useful everyday English expressions.

How to give good wishes: wish or hope?

There’s a mistake English students often make when they want to give good wishes to someone. They muddle up wish and hope. Today we’re going to fix that and we’ll also show you some other ways to say nice things to people in English.

I’m off
Oh, where are you going?
To the dentist’s. Wish me luck.

‘Wish me luck’. Notice that structure. To wish somebody something.
We might write this message for a bride and groom when they get married. Or maybe a colleague is retiring from work. We might write this in their card. They’re nice things to write.
But they’re for written English and they’re quite formal. Someone might say them in an official speech at an important occasion. But if we want to wish someone something, we usually say ‘hope’ instead. So, ‘We hope you have a great life and lots of fun together’, or ‘I hope you have a wonderful retirement’.

I’m off
Oh, where are you going?
To the dentist’s. Wish me luck.
Have you got a problem then?
Yes, I’ve got a toothache.
I hope it’s nothing serious.
Thanks.

Jay said ‘Wish me luck’ and I said ‘I hope it’s nothing serious.’ I didn’t say ‘wish’. That would sound funny.
So if we’re making a wish, we don’t say wish. We say hope. Wow, sometimes English is weird. What’s going on?
Wishes are magical things. The idea is that if we think of or imagine something enough, it will come true. But we all know magic isn’t real. When we want to talk about things that are real possibilities, we use hope instead of wish.
This means that we say wish when we’re talking about the action of wishing. But if we’re actually doing the action and giving good wishes to someone, it’s different. We don’t normally say wish when we’re talking about real possibilities.
It’s tricky so let’s look at some more situations. Imagine you’re saying goodbye to someone at an airport. What will you say to them?
These sentences are both grammatically correct, but I wish you a nice flight is very formal. We don’t normally say it. We say ‘I hope you have a nice flight’, or just ‘Have a nice flight.’ We often use the verb ‘have’ when we’re wishing people things.

  • Have a nice day.
    Have a great vacation.
    Have a nice trip.
    Have a great weekend.

OK, another situation. Your friend is sick. You call them and what do you say?
You say ‘I hope’, of course. When we’re doing the action of wishing we use hope not wish. And often we just say ‘Get well soon.’
OK. Another situation. Someone calls to wish your friend a happy birthday. But your friend is out so you take a message. What do you say to your friend when they return?
Which one? Let’s see it in action.

Thanks for calling. Yeah, I’ll tell him. OK. Bye now. Oh.
Who was that?
Kathy.
Uh oh. What did she want this time?
She called to wish you a happy birthday.
Oh that was nice of her.
And she wants you to work late tonight.
Oh.

So which sentence did I say? I said wish. I was talking about a wish, not doing the action and making the wish.
If I wanted to make the wish, I’d do it like this.

Hey Jay, happy birthday.
Oh thank you.
I hope you like them.
Oh I’m sure I will. It’s hair curlers?
Yes. Can I borrow them some time?
Errr. Sure.
Thank you!

So to make the wish, I just said ‘happy birthday.’ And did you notice what I said about the hair curlers?
We can say ‘I hope you like them’ or ‘I hope that you like them’. Both are correct. We often we skip ‘that’ when we’re speaking.
Great. So now you know how we use ‘hope’ to give good wishes, and you also know about this structure and when to use it.
But this structure is just the start. There are other structures we use with ‘hope’ and ‘wish’ so we’re making more videos about them.
Make sure you’ve subscribed to our channel and click the notification bell so you don’t miss them. And maybe your friends would like to learn about hope and wish too. Why not share this video with them? See you next Friday.
Click hereto learn more useful everyday English expressions.
Click here to learn how to use the verbs wait, hope, expect and look forward to

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Thank you all for the warm wishes

Have a nice day

wish have a nice day

In this article, we discuss what native French speakers say when leaving to wish someone a good day - or some other moment in time : afternoon, evening, week, month, year, holiday, event etc.

As always, there are various phrases you can use depending on the time of day, time of year, or event.  Each phrase also can take on numerous variations that you can choose from.  Which one you pick depends in turn on how formal or informal you want to be, and how much emphasis you want to convey.

Let's start with the basics : wishing someone a nice day as we leave.

Have a nice day in French

There are a few ways to say "have a nice day" in French.

The closest to English is :  "Passe une bonne journée" (note : you cannot say "passe un bon jour", a mistake many beginners tend to make).

Example :

"Bon, j'y vais, merci pour le café ! A plus tard, passe une bonne journée !" (OK I'm leaving, thanks for coffee ! See you later, have a nice day !)

"Merci, bonne journée à toi aussi !"

In the last sentence, we use "bonne journée !", a shorter version of "passe une bonne journée" that's also very commonly used for "have a nice day" in French :

"Au revoir madame, bonne journée !" (good bye ma'am, have a nice day)

"Au revoir monsieur, merci, bonne journée à vous aussi." (good bye sir, thanks, have a nice day too)

Looking at these examples, you can tell "have a nice day" is used when leaving, i.e. for good-bye, not for hello.

For example, you may NOT say "Bonjour, bonne journée !" If you do, the person you say it to will be puzzled and confused. It's like saying "Hello, good bye".

In a more formal context, you can say "j'espère que vous passerez une bonne journée", for example when talking to a customer.  This literally translates to "I hope you have a nice day".

Another slightly formal version is "je te souhaite une bonne journée" or "je vous souhaite une bonne journée".   Here you're literally wishing the person a good day (I wish you a nice day).

If you want to be very friendly and pleasant, you can further emphasize what you say by adding "très" :

"passe / passez une très bonne journée !" : have a great day

"Très bonne journée !" : same meaning

"J'espère que vous passerez une très bonne journée !"  :  I hope you have a great day !

Variation of have a nice day in French : have a nice afternoon

If it's after mid-day, before ending a conversation in French you typically say "have a good afternoon" instead of "have a nice day" :

"Passez une bonne après-midi !"

Or simply : "Bon après-midi !"

Note that "après-midi" can be considered either masculine or feminine :  "un après-midi" and "une après-midi" are both acceptable.   So we can write either "bon après-midi" or "bonne après-midi".

Here's an example dialogue :

"Bon, on part jouer au foot.  A plus tard !"

"D'accord, bon après-midi ! amusez-vous bien."

Note that, in colloquial, spoken French, native speakers sometimes say "bon aprem !".

As you've probably guessed, "aprem" is shortcut for "après-midi" - French speakers have a strong habit of shortening every word they can : la fac, perso, pro, la rando, l'expo, la prépa etc.

You can also use the semi-formal structures we saw above when discussing "bon après-midi" :

"J'espère que tu passeras une bonne après-midi"

"Je vous souhaite une bonne après-midi"

Variation of have a nice day in French : have a nice evening

This phrase is typically used starting late afternoon, and until after dinner time  (after that it's "night" time).  Where you would say "have a nice day" in the morning, you can say :

"Passe / passez une bonne soirée !" : have a nice evening

Or, the short version : "bonne soirée !"

Example dialogue :

"Il est 18h, je m'en vais.  Je finirai le travail demain."

"OK, passe une bonne soirée !"

"Merci, bonne soirée à toi.  A demain."

Just like "have a nice day", in a more formal setting, you can extend the phrase with "j'espère" or "je te/vous souhaite":

"J'espère que vous passerez une bonne soirée" : I hope you'll have a good evening.

"Je te souhaite une bonne soirée !" : I wish you a nice evening.

Variation of have a nice day in French : have a good night

When you are ready to call it a day and to leave the place you're at, you typically say "bonne nuit !"

Some native speakers also pronounce it like this :

"bonne nuit" is generally associated with the act of sleeping.  Suppose you had people over for dinner and it's quite late.  They're about to leave your house to go to a club downtown.  In this case, you don't usually say "bonne nuit" since they're not about to go to sleep.  Instead you may say "bonne soirée" even though it's late.

The same variations as for "have a nice day" can be used for "bonne nuit" :

"Passe / passez une bonne nuit !" :  have a good night

"Je vous souhaite une bonne nuit !" : I wish you a good night

Example :

"Merci pour cette soirée très sympa ! Bonne nuit !"

"Merci à vous ! Bonne nuit, à demain !"

Variation of have a nice day in French :  have a nice week

Besides the different times of the day, the French phrases we've seen so far can also be applied to other moments and events.  Remember, you say these phrases when you're about to leave the person you're speaking with, to say good bye.

Here's a common one that you can use when parting away from a person you won't be seing for a week :

"Passez une bonne semaine !" or "bonne semaine !": have a nice week

You can use them for specific periods of time and events, such as vacations.   Here are some examples using the same structure as with "have a nice day" previously :

"Passez de bonnes vacances !" or "bonnes vacances !" : have a nice vacation

"Passez un bon séjour !", "bon séjour !", "nous vous souhaitons un bon séjour" : have a nice stay, we wish you a nice stay .  Note that all the variants, including those with "souhaiter" and "espérer", apply to the above examples as well.

More generally, in French you can use these phrases for all kinds of moments :

"Bon cinéma !" : have a good movie

"Bonne visite !" : have a nice visit

"Passez une bonne fête !" : have a good party

"je vous souhaite un bon Noël" : I wish you a nice Christmas

"J'espère que vous passerez une bonne fin d'année" : hope you have a nice year end

"Passez une bonne cérémonie !" : have a nice ceremony

Let's finish with a little quiz

To conclude this discussion about how to say "have a nice day" and other related good-bye phrases in French, let's see if you really got the hang of it.

Try to fill in the blanks in the short dialogues below, and write your answers in the comments at the bottom of this article.  There are several possible answers for each, just pick one you think is appropriate. Here you go :

1) Chérie, je sors, salut à ce soir !

Conduis prudemment ! __________

2) Je pars aux Antilles pour une semaine à partir de mardi prochain !

C'est génial ça ! __________

3) Je serai chez les voisins de 17h à 18h, ils font un petit apéro pour leur arrivée.

C'est sympa ça ! ___________

4)  Nous allons visiter le musée demain, il y a une belle expo de Modigliani.

Très intéressant, dommage que je ne puisse pas venir.  _____________

That's all ! Have a nice one ! (not really translatable into French, the closest is probably "bon courage !")

So we'll teach you how to say 'Have a Nice Day' in formal, standard, and as the Korean word for 'goodbye' implies that you wish somebody a good day.

41 Good Safe Travels Sayings

wish have a nice day

English Sentence:

Have a nice day!

Chinese Translation (Traditional):

祝你有愉快的一天!

Chinese Translation (Simplified):

祝你有愉快的一天!

Pinyin:

zhu4 ni3 you3 yu2 kuai4 de5 yi4 tian1!

Listen to Chinese Sentence:



Words used:

祝   祝

zhù

to wish, to express good wishes

[Show Details]
你   你



1. you (male) 2. your (male)

Here: you (male)

[Show Details]
有   有

yǒu

1. to have 2. to own 3. there is, there are 4. to be, to exist

Here: to have

[Show Details]
愉快   愉快

yú kuài

cheerful, pleasant, delightful, joyful

[Show Details]
的   的

de

1. of, ~'s (possessive particle) 2. (adjectival ending) 3. (used at the end of a declarative sentence for emphasis) 4. (used to form a nominal expression)

Here: (adjectival ending)

[Show Details]
一天   一天

yì tiān

one day, per day

Here: one day

[Show Details]


3 days ago Have a Nice Day! You don't get paid for having ideas. You get paid for making them happen. Good Morning. Everything happens for a reason.

wish have a nice day
Written by Arashirisar
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